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I am an Android/Java beginner, not that much with coding but rather with the language(s).

My problem:

I am drawing a graph (for some statistical analysis) with canvas.drawLine() with different colors for each line. The color depends on the value of an array. That array(list) holds custom objects that have about 20 variables of different types.

At some point, I need a switch to get the right type for each draw-call, but for the entire loop, that switch has the same outcome. As I am almost finished with the program I am looking for performance issues and this is one. The graph draws at least 1000 lines so the switch runs 1000 times for the same result.

If I had arrays and not custom objects i could simply use an int to access the different array values. But there is no way to rewrite it so that the objects can be avoided (would mess up the code big time at other places).

Now I read about polymorphism and reflections but... To be honest, I dont want to implement something that I dont completely understand and that is not bulletproof (reflections are said to be prone to error ?!)

My current solution is that I simply created a custom drawing method for each case. I have one switch before the loop and then the drawing method with the right getter is working. It works, however it seems crazy to have 10 methods with only one line different.

Now there is also the abstract class thing but it confuses me a bit and im wondering if those overwritten methods wont cause more performance trouble than the switch. I read something about what java does in the end and that those cross-class method calls could cost performance (i admit it was something about inner/nested classes calling a getter of their outter class).

I want the code to be as short and readable as possible, so I would like to have it all in one code-block (kinda) rather than spread across different classes but thats just a personal preference. The most important thing is, that I completely understand what I am implementing. I dont want some example that I copy and paste with 'enter your method here' and see it working but dont know why or how.

So I am actually more interested in the theoretical how I should do it than actual code snippets (ofc the snippets wont hurt ;) )

PS: Should I have a code smell somewhere, feel free to mention it.

Some code, simplyfied and focused on the problem

Class MyObj {

  int x;
  int y;

  double value_doub;
  short value_short;

  // getters and setters etc
}


private void draw_graph(int switchcase) {
  MyObj mObj;
  int x;
  int y;
  double value;

  for(int i = 0; i < amount_of_values; i++) {

    mObj = mArrayList.get(i);

    x = mObj.getx();
    y = mObj.gety();

    switch(switchcase) {

    case 0:
      value = mObj.get_value_doub();

      //alternatively, direct field access
      value = mObj.value_doub;

      color = calc_color(value, scale_for_this_type);
    break;

    case 1:
      value = (double) mObj.get_value_short();

      //alternatively, direct field access
      value = (double) mObj.value_short;

      color = calc_color(value, scale_for_this_type);
    break;

    // etc...  10+ cases
    }


  drawLine(last_x, last_y, x, y, color);

  }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Can you post some code? –  Tudor Dec 11 '11 at 14:15
    
Your "question" is far too long. Please can you condense all this down to a simple question? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 15:18
    
Hmmm im having a bit of trouble with condensing it but: "How do i avoid the inner switch without messing up the code" –  NikkyD Dec 11 '11 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is OK, but not very object-oriented. I would probably use some kind of Drawer interface, and pass the appropriate implementation, rather than an int, to the draw_graph method (which I would rename drawGraph to respect naming conventions):

public interface Drawer {
    void draw(MyObj obj, Graphics g);
}

...

private void drawGraph(Drawer drawer) {
    for(int i = 0; i < amountOfValues; i++) {
        MyObj obj = arrayList.get(i);
        drawer.draw(obj, g);
    }
}

...

class Drawer1 implements Drawer {
    @Override
    public void draw(MyObj obj, Graphics g) {
        // same code as in case 1 of the switch
    }
}
class Drawer2 implements Drawer {
    @Override
    public void draw(MyObj obj, Graphics g) {
        // same code as in case 2 of the switch
    }
}

If all the drawers share some code, then make them all extend a base AbstractDrawer class.

share|improve this answer
    
Good idea. Since the code used to involve a switch, consider making Drawer an enum –  user949300 Dec 11 '11 at 18:59
    
I'm sorry i dont understand how that interface works, at what point would the switch/decision, what to draw, happen ? –  NikkyD Dec 11 '11 at 19:34
    
Rather than passing an int (which decides which case your switch statement will execute), pass the appropriate instance of Drawer. The decision takes place at the same place. –  JB Nizet Dec 11 '11 at 21:00
    
So i would need a switch case before to decide which drawer obj to pass ? –  NikkyD Dec 11 '11 at 21:08
    
It depends. You could put all the drawers in an array and pass the drawer at the index of the int value you're passing now. –  JB Nizet Dec 11 '11 at 21:12

The x,y, and value are properties of MyObj. What does calc_color do, and where does scale_for_this_type come from? Could that work be done within, or largely within MyObj based upon it's fields?? If so, your loop could pretty much call myObj.drawLineYouFigureOutTheColor(perhapsAnArgumentOrTwoHere). You'd have to track last_x and last_y somewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
the problem is, that the method to read the value had to be stored somehow if i dont call individual methods. The decision what to present/draw has to be made at some point and that means a variable will have to receive some value and that variable needs to be evaluated at some point. If that point is within the loop, it costs me performance. If it is before the loop, then the question is how to do that with the least amount of chaos in code. –  NikkyD Dec 11 '11 at 20:41

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