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I know this question has been asked several times an I spent all day trying to understand other answers, but since I am very new to C# and WPF nothing helped me so far. I will try to explain my exact problem as much as I can so it will directly help me.

In my MainWindow.xaml I have a progress bar and some button starting a new thread and a long calculation:

<ProgressBar Height="....... Name="progressBar1"/>
<Button Content="Button" Name="button1" Click="button1_Click" />

Now within my MainWindow.xaml.cs:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Thread thread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(MyLongCalculation));

        ParameterClass myParameters = new ParameterClass();
        thread.Start(myParameters);
    }

    public void MyLongCalculations(object myvalues)
    {
        ParameterClass values = (ParameterClass)myvalues;
        //some calculations
    }
}

public class ParameterClass
{
    //public variables...
}

Now somehow I have to include somethign in my method MyLongCalculations that will keep updating progressBar1. However, I just can't manage to get it working. I know all this is very simple, but unfortunately it is the level I am at the moment on with C# so I hope an answer not too complicated and as detailed as possible would be great.

share|improve this question
2  
If you read a lot and tried a lot you should include that in your question in detail. Like, what have you read, what have you tried, what was the outcome, how was it not what you wanted. –  H.B. Dec 11 '11 at 16:47
    
Have you tried Dispatcher.BeginInvoke()? –  Anatolii Gabuza Dec 11 '11 at 22:30
1  
Yes, now I have, I had to read quite a lot first and also looked at the answers. Now it works, both with Dispatcher and BackgroundWorker. –  phil13131 Dec 13 '11 at 1:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Background worker is well suited for this.

try this:

/// <summary>
/// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
/// </summary>
public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        // Initialize UI
        InitializeComponent();

        // Process data
        ProcessDataAsync(new ParameterClass { Value = 20 });
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Processes data asynchronously
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="myClass"></param>
    private void ProcessDataAsync(ParameterClass myClass)
    {
        // Background worker
        var myWorker = new BackgroundWorker
        {
            WorkerReportsProgress = true,
        };

        // Do Work
        myWorker.DoWork += delegate(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            // Set result
            e.Result = MyLongCalculations(myClass);

            // Update progress (50 is just an example percent value out of 100)
            myWorker.ReportProgress(50);
        };

        // Progress Changed
        myWorker.ProgressChanged += delegate(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            myProgressBar.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
        };

        // Work has been completed
        myWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += delegate(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            // Work completed, you are back in the UI thread.
            TextBox1.Text = (int) e.Result;
        };

        // Run Worker
        myWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Performs calculations
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="myvalues"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public int MyLongCalculations(ParameterClass myvalues)
    {
        //some calculations
        return (myvalues.Value*2);
    }

}

/// <summary>
/// Custom class
/// </summary>
public class ParameterClass
{
    public int Value { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, I will try that. However, the method (in this simple case: MyLongCalculation() needs an input from the UI. At the moment I would have probably just created a class that will be used to save all the values since using ParameterizedThreadStart only allows an input of an object. How do I give an input to a BackgroundWorker? May it be from an object using my ParameterClass. Or maybe directly from the UI´s TextBoxes... –  phil13131 Dec 12 '11 at 20:24
    
I updated it with the ability to grab the result and return it to the main thread. RunWorkerCompleted is in the UI thread, so you could add the return value to a UI control at that point without thread contention. –  Xcalibur37 Dec 12 '11 at 22:53
    
Ahh. It works, thank you so much. –  phil13131 Dec 12 '11 at 23:54
    
Is there a way to use the BackgroundWorker and update the UI too? For example a text of a textbox?! –  phil13131 Dec 13 '11 at 0:05
    
Updated to demonstrate updating "TextBox1". Remember, RunWorkerCompleted is back in the UI thread, so you can just call your UI object directly from there. –  Xcalibur37 Dec 13 '11 at 0:12

You can use Dispatcher.BeginInvoke() to push UI changes on the UI thread rather than worker thread. Most important thing - you need to access Dispatcher which is associated with UI thread not a worker thread you are creating manually. So I would suggest cache Dispatcher.Current and then use in a worker thread, you can do this via ParametersClass or just declaring a dispatchr field on a class level.

public partial class MainWindow
{
    private Dispatcher uiDispatcher;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponents();

        // cache and then use in worker thread method
        this.uiDispatcher = uiDispatcher;
    }

    public void MyLongCalculations(object myvalues)
    {
        ParameterObject values = (ParameterObject)myvalues;
        this.uiDispatcher.BeginInvoke(/*a calculations delegate*/);
    }
}

Also if you need to pass a UI dispatcher in some service/class (like ParametersClass) I would suggest take a look at this nice SO post which show how you can abstract it by an interfaces with ability to push UI changes synchronously/asynchronously so it would be up to a caller (basically use Invoke() or BeginInvoke() to queue a delegate in the UI messages pipeline).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I think to really understand this I will really start learning about Multithreading and Dispatchers. Since I so far only programmed in C, something like that was not really possible and all calculations for me were so far done in the console one after another. It´s quite a big change to suddenly go to object oriented + UI + multithreading =S –  phil13131 Dec 12 '11 at 20:27
    
Okay, I managed to do it, however, I my calculations are VERY long, I would still have to wait until one of the loops are done. I will see how it works. –  phil13131 Dec 12 '11 at 23:51

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