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I've got other programmer code, how can put "if's", instead of assertion, in this part of it? Or perhaps, there is third, better way.

public Wezel<Wartosc,Indeks> getWujek() 
    {
        assert rodzic != null; // Root node has no uncle
        assert rodzic.rodzic != null; // Children of root have no uncle
        return rodzic.getBrat();
    }
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Out of curiosity, why do you want to do this? – Matt Ball Dec 11 '11 at 17:41
    
I'm not quite sure about it's semantic correctness, and i want to make it better. – Noran Dec 11 '11 at 18:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

An assertion is roughly equivalent to:

if (!condition) {
    throw new AssertionError();
}
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1  
besides that assertions only work when the -ea switch is passed to the JVM – ratchet freak Dec 11 '11 at 17:33
    
I suppose this answer is the best one, because i don't have to catch AssertionError(). – Noran Dec 11 '11 at 17:40
public Wezel<Wartosc,Indeks> getWujek() 
    {
        if(rodzic == null) { // Root node has no uncle
            throw new Exception("Root node has no uncle");
        }
        if(rodzic.rodzic == null) {
            throw new Exception("Children of root have no uncle");
        }
        return rodzic.getBrat();
    }
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Replacing these assertions would take the form of the following validation:

if (rodzic == null)
   throw new MyValidationException("rodzic cannot be null");
if (rodzic.rodzic == null)
   throw new MyValidationException("rodzic.rodzic cannot be null");
return rodzic.getBrat();

Note that there's a distinction between throwing an Exception and an Error - Exceptions are meant to be caught and handled farther up, while Errors indicate a situation that you can't recover from. For example, you might consider a defining and using a MyValidationError if the failed check is irrecoverable.

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