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Is something like this possible in C++ (on Arduino)?

#include "stdio.h"

String str = "foo";

int i[strLength()]; // <- define length of array in function

int strLength() {
  return str.length();
}

int main(void) {
   ...
}

Thank you in advance!

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1  
Are you using C++ or C? C does not have any "String" objects. – Lalaland Dec 11 '11 at 19:03
    
in fact I am using Arduino, which uses C++ I think. – speendo Dec 11 '11 at 19:07
    
What type is String? Is it std::string? Some specific type in your platform? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 11 '11 at 19:37
    
String is an Arduino string (arduino.cc/en/Reference/StringObject). Arduino doesn't have support for any part of the STL. – Matthew Murdoch Dec 12 '11 at 14:53
up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. You would need i to be a pointer and allocate the array in your main:

int *i = NULL;

// etc.

int main(void) {

    i = (int*) malloc(sizeof(*i)*strLength());

    // etc.
}
share|improve this answer
    
hm thank you! would it be a good idea to use code like this (with malloc) on an embedded platform like arduino? – speendo Dec 11 '11 at 19:11
    
@Marcel The arduino compiler might support alloca(which uses stack instead of heap but same interface) , see if you can include <alloca.h>. – Lalaland Dec 11 '11 at 19:14
1  
@Marcel It seems to work on my machine, so the syntax would be i = alloca(sizeof(*i)*strLength());. Just make sure that you do not return from whatever function that you allocate in until you do not need the array any more(i.e. do not create a seperate little function that just allocates the array). – Lalaland Dec 11 '11 at 19:16
1  
@Marcel: By declaring i as a pointer instead of just an array, all the code that reads or writes from i will be a little bit slower because the compiler does not know at compile time where the array is actually stored in memory. Every time it needs to access the array it has to first read the value of the pointer into a special register for pointers, then it can start accessing actual values of the array. This makes things slower but you probably won't notice, so it's not a big deal. – David Grayson Dec 11 '11 at 19:47
    
@DavidGrayson The other option of predefining the length of the array doesn't seem quite elegant. I only have two of those arrays with dynamic length in my program. I'll see if the speed is sufficient. Thank you! – speendo Dec 12 '11 at 15:09

If you are using c++, the correct solution is a std::vector. You will need to look at the docs for std::vector, but here is a conversion of your code to std::vector.

You then use std::vectors the same way you use regular arrays, with the "[]" operator.

#include <cstdio>
#include <vector>

String str = "foo";

int strLength() {  // Needs to come before the use of the function
  return str.length();
}

std::vector<int> i(strLength() ); //Start at strLength


int main(void) {
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Are you saying everyone using C++ should always be using std::vector? The OP is compiling his code for an 8-bit microcontroller that has 32 KB total of program memory and runs at 20 MHz, so avoiding templates and the standard library could save significant resources, but I'm not sure how much. – David Grayson Dec 11 '11 at 19:39
    
@David Either way he is going to have to dynamically allocate his array. While things such as iostreams will have a large run time cost, the cost of using a mostly compile time std::vector should be small. – Lalaland Dec 11 '11 at 19:42
1  
@David But you are right, in that for certain cases alloca combined with the Jim's answer will be better than using std::vector which is designed for only heap. – Lalaland Dec 11 '11 at 19:44
    
Sorry, it actually runs a little slower: 16 MHz. – David Grayson Dec 11 '11 at 19:51
1  
avr-gcc (the compiler used by Arduino) does not currently support any part of the STL so using std::vector isn't possible. – Matthew Murdoch Dec 12 '11 at 14:59

I know it's not what you were hoping for, but I would just do something inelegant like this:

String str = "foo";
#define MAX_POSSIBLE_LENGTH_OF_STR 16

...

int i[MAX_POSSIBLE_LENGTH_OF_STR];

The idea is that you allocate more space for the array than you actually need, and just avoid using the extra parts of the array.

Alternatively, if you aren't going to be changing the definition of str in your source code very often, you could save some RAM by doing this:

String str = "foo";
#define LENGTH_OF_STR 3

...

int i[LENGTH_OF_STR];
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