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Why the following is possible in C?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <process.h>

main()
{
    int array[][3] = {11, 22, 33, 44, 55, 66, 77, 88, 99};

    int * pArr = &array;
    int i=0;

    printf("Addr\tValue\n");
    for(i=0 ; i<9 ; i++)
    {
        printf("%d\t%d\n", &pArr[i], pArr[i]);
    }

    system("PAUSE");
}

Output

Addr    Value
2358344 11
2358348 22
2358352 33
2358356 44
2358360 55
2358364 66
2358368 77
2358372 88
2358376 99

enter image description here

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closed as not a real question by Mat, sth, Tim Cooper, Jens Gustedt, Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 11 '11 at 20:55

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
google.com.ng/… –  Mob Dec 11 '11 at 19:00
    
can i haz codez plz? –  Darren Burgess Dec 11 '11 at 19:01
    
If you turn on compiler warnings, you'll find that your code isn't valid. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 19:13
    
I have coded this on VC++2008Express. And I found no error and not even any message from the debug library. –  BROY Dec 11 '11 at 19:15
    
@Saqib: Like I said, turn on compiler warnings. (Something like Project->Properties->C/C++->General->Warning Level.) –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 19:18
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3 Answers 3

It depends what you mean. Here is one possible interpretation:

int x[5][10];  // 2D array
int (*p)[5][10] = &x;  // Pointer to 2D array

(*p)[3][2] = 1;  // Dereferencing pointer

And here is another:

int x[5*10];  // 1D array
int *p = x;   // Pointer to first element of array

p[3*10+2] = 1;  // Dereferencing pointer

And here is another:

int **p;    // Pointer to pointer
p = malloc(sizeof(*p) * 5);  // Create array of pointers
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    p[i] = malloc(sizeof(p[i]) * 10);  // Create array of ints
}

p[3][2] = 1;  // Dereferencing pointer

...

// Clearup
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    free(p[i]);
}
free(p);
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int **pointer;

pointer holds the address of the first element of a collecton of int * elements.

That first element is an int * pointer.

That element may point to an actual int.

So, pointer points to the first element of a collection of pointers, of which the first element points to an int. If you add 1 to pointer, you get the next pointer that may point to an int

This is what "2D" means in C pointer arithmetics.

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1  
Not really. It is possible to have a true 2D array (e.g. int x[3][4]), which is completely different to a pointer-to-pointer. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 19:48
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You can't; a pointer only tells you where to look, not what the target is.

Take this example 2D array:

1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8
9 0 1 2

This will be represented in the memory as

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2

Only if you know that this is an int[3][4] you can get the array again. C does not store whether it's an int[2][6] or int[3][4].

If you know the dimensions of the array, it becomes easy, since you can simply assign it.

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There's no information at runtime, but that doesn't mean you can't do size-specific stuff. See my answer. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 19:02
    
Also, you can't write int arry[3][4] = pointer;. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 19:03
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