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I'm looking to take in two lists of equal length and return a list of all indices where the lists are not equal to each other.

For example, if I put in ("orange" "yellow" "green" "green") and ("orange" "green" "yellow" "green"), I would expect as a return (1 2) ((assuming list indices start at 0 in scheme)).

How should I go about this?

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Is this homework? what have you done so far? - show some effort first!. And another thing, your example contradicts what you wrote: (0 3) are the indexes where the elements in the list are equal to each other –  Óscar López Dec 11 '11 at 20:19
    
This isn't exactly homework. This problem itself was not assigned. I am trying to write a procedure that would do this in order to solve solve something that was assigned for homework. And I do not know how to do this, which which why I asked how I could go about it. If you have nothing to contribute to help with the problem you do not need to comment. –  user1023010 Dec 11 '11 at 20:47

1 Answer 1

I'll give you the general idea of what needs to be done, and I'll let you figure out the details - I don't want to spoil the homework for you:

(define (unequal-indexes lst1 lst2)
  (unequal-aux lst1 lst2 XXX1))

(define (unequal-aux l1 l2 idx)
  (cond ((null? l1) 
         XXX2)
        ((equal? (car l1) (car l2))
         XXX3)
        (else
         XXX4)))

First, you have to realize that you'll need a way to keep track of the index you're on. For that, I defined an auxiliar procedure, unequal-aux, which gets called from the main procedure, unequal-indexes. In the above code, fill-in the blanks for:

  • XXX1: what is the initial index?
  • XXX2: what should be returned if the list is empty? having in mind, that we want to return a list of indexes
  • XXX3: what happens if the current elements in both lists are equal? hint: the recursion must continue on both lists, and the index must be incremented, but we don't add an element to the list that's being built
  • XXX4: what happens if the current elements in both lists are different? hint: the recursion must continue on both lists, and the index must be incremented, and this time we do add an element to the list that's being built - which element? the index we're currently on

Of course, by now you must know that a list is built by cons-ing each element to the rest of the list, until we reach the empty (null) list.

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