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I'm starting to work on a small soccer league management website (mostly for learning purposes) and can't wrap my mind around a Django models relationship. For simplicity, let's say I have 2 types of objects - Player and Team. Naturally, a player belongs to one team so that's a ForeignKey(Team) in the Player model. So I go:

class Team(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
class Player(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
    team = models.ForeignKey(Team)

Then I want each team to have a captain which would be one of the players so that would be a ForeignKey(Player) in the Team model. But that would create a circular dependency. Granted my Django experience is limited, but it seems like a simple problem, though I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong conceptually.

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Have you actually tried to do this? –  Chris Dec 11 '11 at 19:23
1  
@Chris Sure, I have. Have you? –  exfizik Dec 11 '11 at 19:45

7 Answers 7

as you can see in the docs, for exactly this reason it is possible to specify the foreign model as a string.

team = models.ForeignKey('Team')
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Let me get this straight. Now I have: class Team(models.Model): name = models.CharField(max_length=50, unique=True) captain = models.ForeignKey('Player', related_name='captain') class Player(models.Model): name = models.CharField(max_length=50) team = models.ForeignKey(Team) But this generates different SQL tables. The "team" table has "captain_id" integer NOT NULL whereas the "player" table has "team_id" integer NOT NULL REFERENCES "tm_team" ("id") so it seems that specifying the foreign model as a string produces a different result. –  exfizik Dec 11 '11 at 19:38
    
Well, you have to work around the ciruclar dependency, don't you? This does not have much to do with Django, as it has to do with SQL. How could you insert something when both tables referenced each other? –  middus Dec 11 '11 at 19:42
    
@middus Well, I don't know how this kind of things are done which is why I asked. If the only way is to use such a workaround then I'll take it. However, I had thought there would be a way that's not a workaround. –  exfizik Dec 11 '11 at 19:54
    
This is the official way to do it. As middus said, you cannot have a circular dependency at SQL level, so Django has to fake one of the depemdencies at model level. From your point of view as a developer, you can't tell the difference as Django enforces both relationships in the same way. –  Blair Dec 11 '11 at 21:05
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is another way to tackle this problem. Instead of creating a circular dependency, I created an additional table that stores the relationship between players and teams. So in the end it looks like this:

class Team(Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=50)

    def get_captain(self):
        return PlayerRole.objects.get(team=self).player

class Player(Model):
    first_name = CharField(max_length=50)
    last_name = CharField(max_length=50, blank=True)

    def get_team(self):
        return PlayerRole.objects.get(player=self).team

PLAYER_ROLES = (
    ("Regular", "Regular"),
    ("Captain", "Captain")
    )

class PlayerRole(Model):
    player = OneToOneField(Player, primary_key=True)
    team = ForeignKey(Team, null=True)
    role = CharField(max_length=20, choices=PLAYER_ROLES, default=PLAYER_ROLES[0][0])
    class Meta:
        unique_together = ("player", "team")

It might be slightly less efficient in terms of storage than the suggested workaround, but it avoids the circular dependency and keeps the DB structure clean and clear. Comments are welcome.

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You could use the full application label in the foreign key to the model not yet defined, and use related_name to avoid name conflict:

class Team(models.Model):
    captain = models.ForeignKey('myapp.Player', related_name="team_captain")

class Player(models.Model):
    team = models.ForeignKey(Team)
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Although there is nothing wrong with having two references to the same model, perhaps there is a better way to solve this particular problem.

Add a boolean to the Team model to identify a player + team combination as captain:

class Team(models.Model):
  player = models.ForeignKey(Player)
  name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
  is_captain = models.BooleanField(default=False)

To search for a team's captain:

Team.objects.filter(is_captain=True)

Personally I don't like this method because the search semantics don't make sense (ie, a "team" is not a "captain").

The other approach is to identify each player's position:

class Player(models.Model):
   name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
   position = models.IntegerField(choices=((1,'Captain'),(2,'Goal Keeper'))
   jersey = models.IntegerField()

   def is_captain(self):
     return self.position == 1

class Team(models.Model):
   name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
   player = models.ForeignKey(Player)

   def get_captain(self):
      return self.player if self.player.position == 1 else None

This makes a bit more sense when you search:

Player.objects.filter(position=1) (return all captains)

Team.objects.get(pk=1).get_captain() (return the captain for this team)

In either case, however you have to do some pre save checks to make sure there is only one player for a particular position.

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This is what you were looking for:

class Team(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
    captain = models.ForeignKey('Player')
class Player(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
    team = models.ForeignKey(Team)
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Neither of the answers here are really that great - creating circular references is never a good idea. Imagine if your database crashed and you had to create it from scratch - how would you create player before team is created, and vice versa? Look a question here: ForeignKey field with primary relationship one I asked a few days ago. Put a Boolean on Player that specifies the captain, and put some pre-save hooks that validate every team must have one-and-only-one captain.

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2  
If you have to recreate your database as scratch, you simply turn off foreign key checking, insert the data, and turn foreign key checking back on. The Django manage.py dumpdata output does this by default, so any backups created from Django are ready to go. Since tbe models have a circular reference by nature, it is far cleaner to define them as such and let Django take care of any dirty work rather than doing it manually with hooks - especially since Django is set up purposely to handle this scenario. –  Blair Dec 11 '11 at 21:12
    
I still think i'd rather have the database clean than had circular relationships - that just seems backwards to me. –  Ben Dec 11 '11 at 21:24
    
I agree with @Blair. It is perfectly logical to say "every player must have a team" and "every team must have some players and a captain". It might sound impossible to achieve, but constraints are checked at the end of a transaction, so you insert your team, insert your players, commit the transaction and then the database checks that constraints are not validated. This is common practice. –  Spycho Jan 23 '12 at 12:09
    
@Ben - How about an example: We have Department objects which defined a department manager, employee objects whicih are employees of departments. Now we have employee.department = ForeignKey(Department) and department.manager = ForeignKey(Employee). Is this not a valid circular relationship? –  Chris Jan 2 '13 at 19:57

Have a Captain table that has player/team columns along with your other tables, and make captain a method of Team:

class Team(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
    def captain(self):
      [search Captain table]
      return thePlayer

class Player(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
    team = models.ForeignKey(Team)

class Captain(models.Model):
    player = models.ForeignKey(Player)
    team = models.ForeignKey(Team)

You'd have to check that you never have more than one captain in the same team though... But you don't have any circular references that way. You could also end up with a captain who isn't in the team he's flagged as captain of. So there's a few gotchas this way.

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