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The fragment below is from a VC++ 2008 Express Edition. Say, I have a class with a member that is a struct. I am trying to define default values for the member variables of this class. Why this does not work?

struct Country{
    unsigned chart	id;
    unsigned int	initials;
    std::string	name;
};

class world{
private:
    Country	         _country;
    unsigned int 	_population;
public:
    world(){};
    world():
             _country(): 
                 id('1'), initials(0), name("Spain") {};
             _population(543000) {}
    :
    :
    ~world(){};
};
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1  
please format it well first. –  Francis May 11 '09 at 4:05
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2 Answers

There are two ways to initialize the country member data. Like this ...

struct Country{
    unsigned char	id;
    unsigned int	initials;
    std::string	name;
};

class world{
private:
    Country	         _country;
public:
     world()
     {
         _country.id = '1';
         _country.initials = 0;
         _country.name = "Spain";
     }
     ~world(){};
};

... or, like this ...

struct Country{
    unsigned char   _id;
    unsigned int    _initials;
    std::string _name;
    Country(
        unsigned char id,
        unsigned int initials,
        const std::string& name
        )
        : _id(id)
        , _initials(initials)
        , _name(name)
    {}
};

class world{
private:
    Country	         _country;
public:
    world()
    : _country('1', 0, "Spain")
    {
    }
    ~world(){};
};

Note that in the second example I find it easier to initialize the Country instance because I defined a constructor as a member of the Country struct.

Or, perhaps you want to give the Country type a default constructor:

struct Country{
    unsigned char   _id;
    unsigned int    _initials;
    std::string _name;
    Country()
        : _id('1')
        , _initials(0)
        , _name("Spain")
    {}
};


class world{
private:
    Country	         _country;
public:
    world()
    {
    }
    ~world(){};
};
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Or both: provide a default constructor and another that takes the whole set of values. In C++ structs are not limited to only data. +1 –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 11 '09 at 6:03
    
There is no need to provide destructor or copy constructor as the default generated one suffices. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 11 '09 at 6:04
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The structure is an aggregate type.

Since it has no constructor you cannot initialise it with normal brackets, you can however use curly braces as you would initialise an array.

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Have you tested that? I would have guessed that you can use that syntax to initialize a Country instance when you define it ... whereas you're assigning it to an already-created Country instance, which I'm not sure is legal. –  ChrisW May 11 '09 at 4:30
    
believe that you can write: country_ = { '1', 0, "Spain" } inside the constructor body (curly braces). That should create a temporary Country object initialized with the values and then assign it to country_. It is not efficient but should work. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 11 '09 at 6:07
    
It seems to depend on the compiler. Explicitly creating a temporary and assigning it to a class-scope member after initialising it with the curly braces will work but doing it as you say - in theory the exact same thing - doesn't seem to work on all compilers. –  Stinomus May 13 '09 at 2:42
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