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My professor really emphasizes protecting against privacy leaks by always using accessors and mutators to access private instance variables; however, do I have to use the getters/setters of a class within the class?

So for instance, if I have the following class:

public class Person 
{
    private String name;
    private int age;
}

and I want to write a toString() method for it. Can I just write:

public String toString()
{
    return name + " " + age;
}

OR do I need to do something like this:

public String toString()
{
    return this.getName() + " " + this.getAge();
}
share|improve this question
3  
That's your choice. – SLaks Dec 11 '11 at 19:31
2  
Did you try it? – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 19:31
5  
Oli, both of them work, but I just want to know what the proper way is. Thanks – LTH Dec 11 '11 at 19:34
    
If you use accessors these might be overridden by a subclass. If that is not desired/intended you need to use the variables directly. – Adriaan Koster Apr 8 '15 at 8:58

10 Answers 10

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You CAN do either one. However, your professor might appreciate using the methods instead of the direct access. Here's why.

Let's say you have a class like this:

class SomeClass {
    private int someValue;
    private String someString;

    public SomeClass(int someValue, String someString) {
        this.someValue = someValue;
        this.someString = someString;
    }

    public int someValue() {
        return someValue;
    }

    public int someString() {
        return someString;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return someValue + ": " + someString;
    }

}

It's pretty straightforward, right? Well, what if all of a sudden we want to CHANGE the implementation of how we calculate someValue, and base it off of someString:

public int someValue() {
    int value = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < someString.length; i++) {
         if(someString.charAt(i) == ' ') value++;
    }
    return value;
}

Now you also have to change every place where variable someValue was used.

So if you want to make the code easier to maintain in the long run, use the methods calls. This way when you code changes on you (and trust me, it changes all the time) you only have to change it in one spot instead of two.

And yes, you would want to use a method call in getting someString instead of the direct access in the last method :-)

share|improve this answer
11  
While this is a valid point, I would like to add that the original question specifically targets getters and setters, which are supposed to be side-effect free and only return the instance variable, not compute values. If the method computes a value, a better name for it would be computeThis, not getThis. And modern IDEs make refactoring multiple changes just as easy as a single one. – JRL Dec 11 '11 at 20:05
3  
@JRL. +500. To maintainer, using a member variable means "no surprises here". – Alexander Pogrebnyak Dec 11 '11 at 20:23
    
As I stated in my answer, the method getSomething should return the value set by setSomething. If you return a different value based on a some condition then that method should not be named getSomething...it should be getSomethingMutated. The method name someValue is not nearly descriptive enough. A method is an action and there is no verb in the method name someValue. That's like naming a field with a verb, such as int getValue. +1 to @JRL and @Alexander. – Paul Dec 11 '11 at 21:42
1  
@JRL The problem is that using the variable right now will work, but what about two years down the road when it has to change? That's the concern - thinking ahead to save time down the road. – corsiKa Dec 11 '11 at 23:07
    
@Paul even if you continue to abide by the contract of getX() and setX() should be consistent (which yes I feel you should) you should not make any assumptions about the implementation underneath and that it is simply storing the variable under there. The only time that would be expected is in beans, which should be hidden away in your data layer. – corsiKa Dec 16 '11 at 15:38

When I design a class I try to make a clear distinction between the inside (implementation details) and the outside (the interface exposed to the world). Using getters and setters internally would muck that up, because they'd be getting used by both the inside and outside.

If you find yourself wanting to hide part of a class from another part of the same class, consider breaking off the part you want to hide into its own class.

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It's normally not a good idea, for a number of reasons:

  • You may not even want accessors for all fields
  • Some accessors may make a defensive copy so not to expose internal state, this is normally unnecessary within the class where you know that you are not going to modify it - or plain wrong if you know you ARE going to modify it
  • It makes debugging more annoying, because you have to follow the getters / setters
  • It makes reading the code harder in most IDEs, since most of them color fields differently than local variables

... but as always, there are exceptions. Some setters may have side-effects (for example setting a second value) that you WANT to execute, then it might be better to use the setter. Also, if you design your class for inheritance, it may be better to go via an accessor if you want the subclass to be able to alter the behavior.

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In general, no. If your getter returns something other than the value of the field then you should use the method, but in that rare case your method should have a more descriptive name. For a bad example, if you have:

public void setName(String name)
{
  _name = name;
}

and your getter returned something else, like

public String getName()
{
  return _name.toUpperCase();
}

then yes, you should use the getter. It would be better, though, to have a more descriptive name for that getter:

public String getNameAsUppercase()
{
  return _name.toUpperCase();
}
share|improve this answer

No, you don't. You can access any variables, private, public or protected, from within the class.

Here are some tables to help you:

enter image description here

Source: Java Tutorials

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1  
Such an awesome little table. I always forget "no modifier". – user166390 Dec 11 '11 at 19:36
2  
When I write 'no modifier' code, people look at it and think it's a prototype and I just didn't take the time to decide what its access level should be. Sorry guys, I wouldn't have put the variable in there if I hadn't thought about who should access it, and it really should be 'no modifier'. I feel Java really made a mistake with that, but only because it's a massive inconvenience to me. – corsiKa Dec 11 '11 at 19:39

If your class (or the accessor methods in question) is not final, then you should definitely use the accessor methods.

If another class extends yours and overrides those accessors, your class should use the overridden accessors. If this would break your superclass, then your superclass is designed incorrectly; prevent those accessors from being overridden with final, or change the design of your class.

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You can use the accessors and mutators, but its a messy standard to follow.

It clutters up your code and confuses anyone trying to read it thinking it might not be a part of your class.

Basically, just access the variables directly from inside your class, and indirectly from anywhere else.

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3  
It's a messy standard? What if all of a sudden you have to change the program in such a way that you can't use the variable now, you have to use a method call. Now you have to change EVERY call in the class... – corsiKa Dec 11 '11 at 19:40
    
It's not clutter. It's only correct to access fields directly when their accessor can't be overridden by a subclass. – erickson Dec 11 '11 at 19:44
1  
@glowcoder it's messy inside of your class, which will always have access to all of its fields. – Jon Dec 11 '11 at 19:48
    
@Jon yes they do have access. But should you use that access just because you can? – corsiKa Dec 11 '11 at 23:06
1  
@Jon That makes no sense, for the same reason it doesn't make sense to access your members directly outside the code. One of the reasons for getters/setters is to separate property behavior from code changes. It's not merely an issue of access--it's an issue of abstraction. – Dave Newton Dec 12 '11 at 2:30

On the flip side, consider it from a design standpoint. One of the motivations for getters/setters is that the underlying data storage can change and things that implement the class won't need to be changed since it is encapsulated.

So, keeping that in mind, using getters/setters within the class makes future changes easier. Instead of having to find all the places that alter the member directly, you just have to change the getter/setter. Depending on the complexity of the class, this may significantly reduce the amount of work it takes to change the storage members.

For example, let's assume you start out with the age variable in years. Then you decide later to store it as seconds for some reason. But you want to always print it in years anyway. So in your example, you could do the math in your toString() function (and anywhere else that wants years as the units) or you can just change the math in the getAge() routine to return years from the seconds and nothing else has to change.

Obviously that example is a bit trivial. The more complicated the class, the more useful it is to use getters/setters within it.

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No you can use directly your instance variables inside the class, you're not violating any "rule". Getters and setters are mandatory for others classes to access instance variables of a class to not violate the encapsulation principle (which is quite important in OO programming).

In the end it's a matter of choice, but you're saving one method call using your first example.

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2  
This is not necessarily true. Getters/setters are not mandatory for access from other classes: [public] member variables are freely accessible in Java -- any other restriction is purely a design choice. (This is in contrast to a language like SmallTalk or Ruby.) – user166390 Dec 11 '11 at 19:34
    
mandatory to not violate encapsulation I meant, I'll edit it. – talnicolas Dec 11 '11 at 19:35
    
In the end, it is a matter of choice - you choose between a method call that is probably going to get JIT'd out anyway, and a couple extra characters in typing and easier maintainability in the long run... – corsiKa Dec 11 '11 at 19:38

I think we should use getters() and setters() instead of accessing directly. it is also makes debugging very easy. e.g if you need to assign a variable multiple place in your class and later you want to find from how many places the variable is assigned then you need to find all the assignment and set the break point.

but if you use a setter you can simply put a break point inside the setter method and can see how many time the variable is assigned.

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