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In C#, after serializing an object to a file how would I deserialize the file back into an existing object without creating a new object?

All the examples I can find for custom serialization involve implementing a constructor that will be called upon deserialization which is exactly what I want except that I don't want the function to be a constructor.

Thanks!

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1  
What serializer are you using? or are you free to use any serializer? –  Marc Gravell Dec 11 '11 at 20:07
    
I haven't started implementing any serialization so I'm free to use any but I was planning on using the BinaryFormatter. –  rob Dec 11 '11 at 20:12
    
"into an existing object" - seems overcomplicated and inefficient. Have you really thought this through? –  Henk Holterman Dec 11 '11 at 20:58
    
It seems a lot less complicated to me. Instead of having to reinitialize my entire application I would just have to change a few member variables. Which is not only less complicated but also more efficient. –  rob Dec 11 '11 at 21:06
2  
@rob deserializing over the top of an active application may be.... troublesome. –  Marc Gravell Dec 11 '11 at 21:08
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4 Answers

Some serializers support callbacks; for example, both BinaryFormatter and DataContractSerializer (and protobuf-net, below) allow you to specify a before-serializaton callback, and since they skip the constructor, this may well be enough to initialize the object. The serializer is still creating it, though.


Most serializers are fussy about wanting to create the new object themselves, however some will allow you to deserialize into an existing object. Well, actually the only one that leaps to mind is protobuf-net (disclosure: I'm the author)...

This has 2 different features that might help here; for the root object (i.e. the outermost object in a graph) you can supply the existing object directly to either the Merge methods (in v1, also present in v2 for compatibility), or (in v2) the Deserialize methods; for example:

var obj = Serializer.Merge<YourType>(source, instance);

However, in a larger graph, you might want to supply other objects yourself (than just the root). The following is not exposed on the attribute API, but is a new feature in v2:

RuntimeTypeModel.Default[typeof(SomeType)].SetFactory(factoryMethod);

where factoryMethod can be either the name of a static method in SomeType (that returns a SomeType instance), or can be a MethodInfo to any static method anywhere. The method can additionally (optionally) take the serialization-context as a parameter if you want. This method should then be used to supply all new instances of SomeType.


Note: protobuf-net is not quite the same as BinaryFormatter; for best effect, you need to tell it how to map your members - very similar to marking things as [DataMember] for WCF/DataContractSerializer. This can be attributes, but does not need to be.

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Thanks for the reply! 1. So if I attach the OnDeserializingAttribute to a function then it will get called before deserialzation but it looks like it will only get the StreamingContext and not the SerializationInfo. Wouldn't I need the SerializationInfo to deserialize? 2. Your merge method would be ideal but I need to supply the object for more then just the root. 3. I think the SetFactory() method would work but it would be pretty messy as I would have to use a Singelton or some kind of public static state –  rob Dec 11 '11 at 21:02
    
Re "1"; you aren't intended to deserialize during the callback, hence why you only get the context. That callback gives you the opportunity to prime the type, similar to what you would have used in your custom creation code. You then either use the default deseriaize engine, or implement custom serialization in addition to the callback. –  Marc Gravell Dec 11 '11 at 21:05
    
Re "2"; then SetFactory may be of use –  Marc Gravell Dec 11 '11 at 21:05
    
Yes I think the SetFactory method would work. I accidentally hit enter before I finished my first comment. I still don't understand the callback method though. What do you mean by "prime the type"? At the time the callback is called the object that I want to deserialize into would have already been created so how would I switch out the empty object that the framework created? –  rob Dec 11 '11 at 21:19
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No problem, just use 2 classes. In getObject method you get your existing object

[Serializable]
public class McRealObjectHelper : IObjectReference, ISerializable 
{
    Object m_realObject;
    virtual object getObject(McObjectId id)
    {
        return id.GetObject();
    }
    public McRealObjectHelper(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
        McObjectId id = (McObjectId)info.GetValue("ID", typeof(McObjectId));
        m_realObject = getObject(id);
        if(m_realObject == null)
            return;
        Type t = m_realObject.GetType();
        MemberInfo[] members = FormatterServices.GetSerializableMembers(t, context);
        List<MemberInfo> deserializeMembers = new List<MemberInfo>(members.Length);
        List<object> data = new List<object>(members.Length);
        foreach(MemberInfo mi in members)
        {
            Type dataType = null;
            if(mi.MemberType == MemberTypes.Field)
            {
                FieldInfo fi = mi as FieldInfo;
                dataType = fi.FieldType;
            } else if(mi.MemberType == MemberTypes.Property){
                PropertyInfo pi = mi as PropertyInfo;
                dataType = pi.PropertyType;
            }
            try
            {
                if(dataType != null){
                    data.Add(info.GetValue(mi.Name, dataType));
                    deserializeMembers.Add(mi);
                }
            }
            catch (SerializationException)
            {
                //some fiels are missing, new version, skip this fields
            }
        }
        FormatterServices.PopulateObjectMembers(m_realObject, deserializeMembers.ToArray(), data.ToArray());
    }

    public object GetRealObject( StreamingContext context )
    {
        return m_realObject;
    }
    [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.LinkDemand, Flags = SecurityPermissionFlag.SerializationFormatter)]
    public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
    }
}

public class McRealObjectBinder: SerializationBinder
{
    String assemVer;
    String typeVer;
    public McRealObjectBinder(String asmName, String typeName)
    {
        assemVer = asmName;
        typeVer = typeName;
    }
    public override Type BindToType( String assemblyName, String typeName ) 
    {
        Type typeToDeserialize = null;
        if ( assemblyName.Equals( assemVer ) && typeName.Equals( typeVer ) )
        {
            return typeof(McRealObjectHelper);
        }
        typeToDeserialize = Type.GetType( String.Format(  "{0}, {1}", typeName, assemblyName ) );
        return typeToDeserialize;
    }
}

Then, when deserialize:

BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter(null, context);
bf.Binder = new McRealObjectBinder(YourType.Assembly.FullName, YourType.FullName);
bf.Deserialize(memStream);
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If it's just a matter of copying a few fields, I would avoid all the trouble and take the simple route - deserialize into a new instance, then copy the appropriate fields to the existing instance. It will cost you a couple of extra copies, but you'll save a lot of time on debugging.

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Yeah this would work but I was hoping there was a cleaner solution. Not sure if using the serialization framework would even be work it at this point. But I might end up doing this. –  rob Dec 11 '11 at 21:28
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It's a bit unusual but it works:

[Serializable]
public class Pets
{
    public int Cats { get; set; }
    public int Dogs { get; set; }
}

public static class Utils
{
    public static byte[] BinarySerialize(object o)
    {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            IFormatter f = new BinaryFormatter();
            f.Serialize(ms, o);
            return ms.ToArray();
        }
    }

    public static dynamic BinaryDeserialize(byte[] bytes, dynamic o)
    {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream(bytes))
        {
            ms.Position = 0;
            IFormatter f = new BinaryFormatter();
            o = (dynamic)f.Deserialize(ms);
            return o;
        }
    }
}

The deserialization is tricky with the dynamic which cannot be passed by reference. And finally a no-sense test for proof:

Pets p = new Pets() { Cats = 0, Dogs = 3 };
Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", p.Cats, p.Dogs);
byte[] serial = Utils.BinarySerialize(p);
p.Cats = 1;
Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", p.Cats, p.Dogs);
p = Utils.BinaryDeserialize(serial, p);
Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", p.Cats, p.Dogs);

The output is the following:

0, 3
1, 3
0, 3

Replace memory strings with file stream and you will get the same results.

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Thanks for the reply! Isn't this still creating a new instance of pets though? I tried testing it by writing a wrapper calss that has an instance of pets but when I call BinaryDeserialize() the wrapper class still points to an old instance pets and not the one with the deserialized values. –  rob Dec 12 '11 at 16:27
    
No it does not create a new instance of pets. Obviously the problem is within your wrapper or in the way you use it. –  drdigit Dec 12 '11 at 16:33
    
I added the following class: public class PetOwner { public Pets ownedPets; } And I added the following code to the main method: PetOwner rob = new PetOwner(); rob.ownedPets = p; At the end of my main method if I call: Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", rob.ownedPets.Cats, rob.ownedPets.Dogs); It prints 1,3 instead of 0,3. Can you see any problems with my wrapper? –  rob Dec 12 '11 at 16:42
    
Possibly (a hidden one). You have to serialize, update cats and deserialize using rob.ownedPets and not p –  drdigit Dec 12 '11 at 16:52
    
Ah I see. But what if I had several classes that pointed to p? –  rob Dec 12 '11 at 17:01
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