Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I need, from within a function, to get it's name (actually I'm going up the stack a bit with .caller but that shouldn't change the problem).

'arguments.callee.name' would solve my problem IF my function had been named. But my functions are declared with var myFunc = function() {}, and changing that is not a possibility (I'm using CoffeeScript which always compiles to var declarations).

So how could I get to the variable to which the function was assigned?

This is for debugging purposes so I'm not worried about performance, I'll use whatever operations get me to the name no matter the processing/time cost.

EDIT: For the record, this is what I implemented in CoffeeScript based on the chosen answer's recommended library:

window.log = (msg) ->
  caller = printStackTrace()[4]
  caller = caller.substring 0, caller.indexOf('(') - 1
  if typeof msg is 'object'
    console.log "v --- at #{ caller }: ---"
    console.log msg
  else console.log "> --- at #{ caller }: " + msg

Works like a charm, thanks everyone!

share|improve this question
2  
Short of doing an analysis of the code just before the point of invocation I don't think this is possible. –  Peter Rowell Dec 11 '11 at 21:25
    
Well, such functions don't have a name, that's why they're called 'anonymous functions'. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 11 '11 at 21:26
    
modern browser JS debuggers do this (compare a stacktrace with anonymous functions in Chrome to say IE7), but they have a lot more context to go off of. –  Matt Greer Dec 11 '11 at 21:27
    
Why are you even trying to do this in the first place? If it is for debugging then the debuggers in most recent browsers are more convenient and powerful. –  hugomg Dec 11 '11 at 21:29
    
It is for debugging, and because of CoffeeScript. I'm pretty limited on debugging so I want to auto-include the caller's name whenever I log stuff to console. –  Vic Goldfeld Dec 11 '11 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You might be interested in this javascript stacktrace project on github. In particular, note the findFunctionName method in stacktrace.js.

Basically they re-fetch the javascript source using XMLHTTPRequest and pull the line where the function was declared.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'm having trouble seeing how to use it outside of error-producing situations, though. How can I simply use such a method as findFunctionName from within a function I define (e.g. a logging function)? –  Vic Goldfeld Dec 12 '11 at 2:52
    
You can produce an error (and of course catch it immediately). –  James Clark Dec 12 '11 at 4:02

If you're using Google Chrome, you can use the Stack Tracing API to get at that information. See: http://code.google.com/p/v8/wiki/JavaScriptStackTraceApi

share|improve this answer
    
But how could I use this mentioned CallSite API directly to get a context-inferred function name from within that function itself? quoted: "The structured stack trace is an Array of CallSite objects, each of which represents a stack frame. A CallSite object defines the following methods:(..)" –  Vic Goldfeld Dec 12 '11 at 2:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.