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i have a referenced default constructor for a class test.

class test {
public:
    test(int &input1) : int_test(input1) {};
    ~test() {};

    int & int_test; 
}; 

Then 2 more classes which interact with test as follows:

class notebook
{ 
public:
    notebook() {};
    ~notebook() {};

    int int_notebook;
};

class factory
{
public: 
    factory() {};
    ~factory(){};

    notebook *p_notebook;
};

If i intitalise test (t2) with an integer, this works as expected:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]){

    int var=90;
    test t2(var);
    cout<<t2.int_test; // this gives 90
    var=30;
    cout<<t2.int_test; // this gives 30

Once i initialised the test class with a pointer to a member of class notebook through a third class factory:

factory f1;
notebook s1;
notebook s2;
s1.int_notebook=10;
s2.int_notebook=2;

int notebook::*p_notebook= &notebook::int_notebook;
f1.p_notebook=&s1;

test t1(((f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook)));
cout<<t1.int_test; // This gives  10

however if i change the pointer of f1.p_notebook to another object of notebook s2;

f1.p_notebook=&s2;
cout<<t1.int_test; // This gives  10

the reference member of a of t1 (t1.int_test) doesnt reflect the change of the pointer. could some one explain to me why ? or what i'm doing wrong here.

share|improve this question
4  
Sorry but... what? This is a mess. Make a clean, tidy, tiny testcase please. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 11 '11 at 21:31
    
I resubmitted with a simpler code! –  A Elansary Dec 11 '11 at 21:44
1  
Even after being properly formatted, that isn't nice code. Should clue you in that something is suboptimal. –  ssube Dec 11 '11 at 21:57
    
thank you for the tip. I tried to make as compact as possible but it seems it was difficult for others to read. –  A Elansary Dec 11 '11 at 22:01

2 Answers 2

class CTester
{
    public:
        CTester(int &input1) : int_test(input1)
        {
            std::cout << int_test << std::endl;
        }
        int &int_test;
};

class notebook
{
    public:
        int int_notebook;
};

class factory
{
    public:
        notebook *p_notebook;
};

int main()
{
    factory f1;
    notebook s1;
    notebook s2;
    s1.int_notebook=10;
    s2.int_notebook=2;

    int notebook::*p_notebook = &notebook::int_notebook;
    f1.p_notebook=&s1;
    CTester t1(f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook);
    f1.p_notebook=&s2;
    CTester t2(f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook);

    return 0;
}

this prints

10
2
share|improve this answer
    
This is not what i'm after. The constructor of class tester is reference to int_tester. If i understand correctly i dont need to reinitialise the default constructor twice to change the value of int_test from 10 to 2 if i had initiated with a interger rather than a pointer to integer. for example. int var=90;test t2(var); var=30; in this case t2.int_test will give 2 but this is not the case when i initiated the constructor with a pointer to an integer. –  A Elansary Dec 11 '11 at 22:07
    
No. The f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook expression will be evaluate to &s1.int_notebook at constructor call, and that pointer will be passed to the contrucor –  Industrial-antidepressant Dec 11 '11 at 22:16
    
but but the constructor is passed to &int_test which is a reference . so why does it work in the first example and fails in the second! please have another look above as i added to the code to see what i'm talking about. –  A Elansary Dec 11 '11 at 22:20
    
I can repeat myself f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook expression will be evaluate to s1.int_notebook so test t1(f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook); equivalent to test t1(s1.int_notebook); –  Industrial-antidepressant Dec 11 '11 at 22:24
    
how can i change t1.int_test by changing the address of f1.p_notebook? –  A Elansary Dec 11 '11 at 22:30

Your class test has a reference to an int. It doesn't know anything about what object that int actually belongs to. Or how it originally got access to that int. Let's break down this line of code:

test t1(((f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook)));

First this:

f1.p_notebook

As of that line, it is a pointer to s1. Now this:

f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook

That's s1's int_notebook member. So with this:

test t1(((f1.p_notebook->*p_notebook)));

You are passing s1's int_notebook member to the constructor of test. So now the object t1 has a reference to s1's int_notebook member. It does not care about the obscure levels of indirection you used to get that member. It[t1] knows nothing of f1, or f1.p_notebook. So when you do this:

f1.p_notebook=&s2;

That has absolutely no effect on s1.int_notebook, and therefore it has no effect on t1's reference member.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Benjamin. this is much clearer now you have explained. I managed to get there by declaring a reference to class notebook and changing it accordingly to manipulate int_test. Which is working fine. However, it seems that this solution if you are working on the heap but i shall do it another posting. THank you so much again. –  A Elansary Dec 11 '11 at 23:56

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