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Lets say I have a object whose purpose is to hold a bunch of pointers for an object type MyObject, and lets say I want a function that adds new MyObjects to the collection like so:

void MyCollection::addObject(){
    MyObject *newObject = new MyObject();
    MyCollection.add(mycollection, newObject);
}

Lets say that MyCollection.add takes in a particular collection object and a pointer and somehow internally stores it. However the problem with this function is while the newObject itself is persistent, the *newObject pointer gets destroyed after the function call so the add() function no longer has a pointer that really points to the object. Is there any good way to make a persistent pointer somehow?

Thanks

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I'd say, "yes, this can be done"; most likely though "this can be done much better using the standard library", and in any case you are not giving enough detail and code and context by far to allow a meaningful response. –  Kerrek SB Dec 11 '11 at 23:57
    
The newObject variable will be destroyed but the object created wont be as you have stored the pointer in your collection –  Ankit Dec 12 '11 at 0:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

However the problem with this function is while the newObject itself is persistent, the *newObject pointer gets destroyed after the function call so the add() function no longer has a pointer that really points to the object.

This betrays a huge misunderstanding about how objects and pointers work.

A pointer is an address. new creates an object on the heap and returns the address. When you pass that address to the collection the collection gets a copy of the address, which is exactly the same as the address you got from new. When the variable newObject goes out of scope and is destroyed, the collection still has the copy of the address, and the address still points to the object. No matter how many copies of the address you make and destroy, the address is still good and the object that the address points to is still good.

In fact, the address you get back from new is a copy of the address that new generated internally, and that original, internal value is destroyed. And when you say MyObject *newObject = new MyObject(); you're making another copy. But it doesn't matter because every copy of the address is as good as every other one.

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Stack-based data -- like your pointer -- doesn't get "destroyed", per se. The variable itself goes out of scope, but the data it contained -- i.e., the address of the MyObject object -- is still totally valid. If the add() method copies the value of the pointer, all will be good.

Incidentally, I hope that the implementation of add() is just

myVector.push_back(newObject);

where myVector is an instance of std::vector. No need to reinvent the wheel!

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The code as written is fine. The pointer will be (must be) copied by the add() method, whose signature is presumably void add(MyObject*).

By the way, your C++ here is invalid:

MyCollection.add(mycollection, newObject);

It should probably be:

mycollection.add(newObject);
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This is not a problem. A well defined add function will make a copy of the pointer, so the original pointer going out of scope won't cause any issues.

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