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In my code below, when I enter in some non-numeric letters at the input (ie. $temp), it responds with "Too cold!" instead of "invalid". What am I missing?

#!/usr/bin/perl

print "What is the temperature outside? ";
$temp=<>;
if ($temp > 72) {
  print "Too hot!\n"; }
elsif ($temp <= 72) {
  print "Too cold!\n"; }
else {
  print "Temperature $temp is invalid.\n"; }
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1  
Perl is a "weakly typed" language in this aspect. Be careful with operators lest coercions (like this!) bite. –  user166390 Dec 12 '11 at 2:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is because it will be treated as 0 if it cannot be converted into a number. You should check before if the response has only numbers, or restrict the input in any other way so that only a valid number can be entered. Something along the lines:

print "invalid" if ($temp =~ /\D/);

(prints invalid if $temp contains any non-digit character. Note that this may invalidate "+" and "-", but you get the idea).

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@kurotsuki - And get in the habit of using "use strict" and "use warnings" ;) –  paulsm4 Dec 12 '11 at 1:21

The numerical comparison operators expect their arguments to be numbers. If you try to compare a string like 'foo' using a numerical comparison, it will be converted silently to the number 0, which is less than 72.

If you had warnings turned on, you would have been told what was going on.

friedo$ perl -Mwarnings -E 'say "foo" < 72'
Argument "foo" isn't numeric in numeric lt (<) at -e line 1.
1

This is why you should always begin your programs with

use strict;
use warnings;
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Casting an invalid numerical string to a number results in 0, therefor you could use something as the below to see if the input was indeed valid or not.

print "What is the temperature outside? ";

$temp=<>;

if ($temp == 0 && $temp ne '0') {
  print "Temperature $temp is invalid.\n"; }
elsif ($temp > 72) {
  print "Too hot!\n"; }
elsif ($temp <= 72) {
  print "Too cold!\n"; }

Explanation: If the input string was casted into 0 (zero) though the string itself isn't equal to '0' (zero) the input is not numeric, hence; invalid.


You could also check to see if the input only consists of [0-9.] by using a regular expression, that would ensure that it's a valid number (also remember that numbers do not start with 0 (zero) and then have digits that follow, unless you are writing in octal.

Note: Remember to trim the input string from white spaces before the above check.

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For precisely this reason (and many others), you're MUCH better off if you enable "use warnings":

#!/usr/bin/perl
    use strict;
    use warnings;
    ...
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Try it after removing the trailing newline, which is probably what's causing Perl to treat it as a string rather than a number:

chomp( my $test = <> );
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