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I'm trying to write a program which solves, via brute force, a question.

The question is determined by the numbers in the array n (which in this case will be 1, 2, 3, 4). I want to do some sort of mathematical operation on these numbers to get a value of 10.

So in this example, using the numbers 1 2 3 4 will be 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 = 10

When writing up the program, I'm not too sure how to actually go about checking all different operations I could perform on the numbers. I tried to define the operations, store each of the values into an array and then iterate through the array to find a solution. Unfortunately this doesn't work ;(

Here is my code, I've commented on the bit I'm having trouble with.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define A +
#define B -
#define C *
#define D /

int main(void)
{
    char ops[3];  //Array to contain the different functions
    ops[0] = 'A';
    ops[1] = 'B';
    ops[2] = 'C';
    ops[3] = 'D';

    int n[3];    //Array containing the numbers which I'm trying to solve
    for(i = 0; i <= 3; i++)
    {
          n[i] = i;
    }

    int solution[2];   //Array which will keep track of the solution
    for(i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        solution[i] = 0;
    }

    while(solution[2] <= 3)
    {
        while(solution[1] <= 3)
        {
            while(solution[0] <= 3)
            {
                //TROUBLE

                //Here I'm going to test it 
                //Was trying to do something like
                n[0] ops[solution[0]] n[1] etc. which should become 1 + 2 except it doesn't :/

            }
        }
    }


    sleep(5000);
    return 0;
}

So, how would I go about storing operations in some sort of array and calling them?

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2  
You declaration and use of ops are not matching, char ops[3] will create an char-array with three elements. By doing ops[3] = 'D' you are writing outside of the bounds of the array. –  Filip Roséen - refp Dec 12 '11 at 1:07
    
And when you say something doesn't work, please explain "how it doesn't work"... –  mtahmed Dec 12 '11 at 1:11
    
Oh lol, that was a test thing :P It doesn't work even if I had it on ops[0]. –  user730882 Dec 12 '11 at 1:12
    
And I don't know why it doesn't work, that's why I'm asking you... –  user730882 Dec 12 '11 at 1:15

3 Answers 3

You'd want to write a function to accomplish this. Macros are processed before compiling the whole program, so it cannot be used with something only known at run-time.

Try this:

int solveOP(int op1, int op2, char op)
{
     switch (op)
     {
     case 'A': // or you can use '+' directly
         return op1+op2;
     case 'B':
         return op1-op2;
     // ...
     default: // when we've check all possible input
         // ERROR!
         // put your own error handling code here.
     }
}

And when you need to use it, instead of n[0] ops[solution[0]] n[1], you say:

solveOP(n[0], n[1], ops[solution[0]]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thing is I simplified the question a fair bit. This problem will probably require more than 4 types of operations in a lot of different orders. I don't particularly want to write out about 100 different cases, that's why I'm trying to do it like this. –  user730882 Dec 12 '11 at 1:24
    
@user730882 Then you'll need an evaluation to evaluation the expressions coded in string like "3+5*2". I'm sorry I'm not familiar with this kind libraries, but this work cannot be done with macros. –  fefe Dec 12 '11 at 1:30
    
@user730882 Some reference: codeproject.com/KB/cpp/rpnexpressionevaluator.aspx arstdesign.com/articles/expression_evaluation.html . They may show you some idea about how to achieve your goal. –  fefe Dec 12 '11 at 1:44

Use a switch statement like so:

switch(op)
{
   case 'A':
     val = a + b;
     break;
   case 'B':
     val = a - b;
     break;
   case 'C':
     val = a * b;
     break;
   ....
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thing is I simplified the question a fair bit. This problem will probably require more than 4 types of operations in a lot of different orders. I don't particularly want to write out about 100 different cases, that's why I'm trying to do it like this. –  user730882 Dec 12 '11 at 1:24
    
Do you also want to test all parenthizations? Like (1+2)*(3+4)? In that case you will need to use an additional loop to loop over the different ways of placing the parentheses. If you don't need that, then the switch statement will work fine. You'll just need to add some logic to determine the order in which the expression will be evaluated, and then evaluate the result with the switch statement. –  Jules Dec 12 '11 at 1:28
    
Yeah, I was planning to use brackets and absolute value, along with factorials and the like. –  user730882 Dec 12 '11 at 1:34

You're looking for function pointers; you could get away with something like this:

typedef int (*op)(int, int);

#define opfunc(op, name) \
     void name(int a, int b){ return a op b; }
opfunc(+, plus)
opfunc(-, minus)
opfunc(/, div)
opfunc(*, times)

op ops[] = { plus, minus, times, div };

int main()
{
    //...etc, your code...
    int result = ops[x](something, somethingelse);
    // ...more code
}
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