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So far, my preference has been to always use EntityManager's merge() take care of both insert and update. But I have also noticed that merge performs an additional select queries before update/insert to ensure record does not already exists in the database.

Now that I am working on a project requiring extensive (bulk) inserts to the database. From a performance point of view does it make sense to use persist instead of merge in a scenario where I absolutely know that I am always creating a new instance of objects to be persisted?

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possible duplicate of JPA EntityManager: Why use persist() over merge()? –  pablosaraiva Sep 12 '14 at 13:52

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up vote 52 down vote accepted

It's not a good idea using merge when a persist suffices - merge does quite a lot more of work. The topic has been discussed on StackOverflow before, and this article explains in detail the differences, with some nice flow diagrams to make things clear.

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I would definitely go with persist persist() if, as you said:

(...) I absolutely know that I am always creating a new instance of objects to be persisted (...)

That's what this method is all about - it will protect you in cases where the Entity already exists (and will rollback your transaction).

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Is it a good coding practice to do something like : try { em.persist(xxx); } catch (RuntimeException re) { try { xxx = em.merge(xxx); } catch (Exception e) { throw e; } } –  phewataal Dec 12 '11 at 19:18
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Despite that catching RuntimeException is definitely not a good practice (but I'll assume you meant EntityExistsException) I wouldn't call it an universal good coding practice. It depends on your requirements. If the requirements says that object must be persisted and it must not exist before this action occurs - I would definitely not try to do merge after catching exception. Moreover, if you use JTA entity manager, your transaction will be already marked for rollback at this time. –  Piotr Nowicki Dec 12 '11 at 22:16
    
can you please explain what do you mean by "Moreover, if you use JTA entity manager, your transaction will be already marked for rollback at this time"? I am using CMT for EJB3 and I was able to verify that as long as I eat the exception within a method boundary, no transaction is rolled back. –  phewataal Jan 20 '12 at 16:54
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I guess that when you invoke persist on an entity that already exists, you'll get EntityExistsException and because of the JPA implementor this transaction will be rolled back (not because it's a runtime exception.). In other words - I think (not sure) that even if you try/catch this exception, the tx will still be marked for rollback. The merge will never throw EntityExistsException. –  Piotr Nowicki May 18 '12 at 20:16

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