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I obtained the following code from the web many years ago and it has served my very well. It is simply a function that generates a sequence of numbers from 1 to whatever you pass in.

Basically it's a way of doing a for loop in a SQL statement.

CREATE FUNCTION [SequenceCreate]
(@MaxValue INT)
RETURNS TABLE
AS

RETURN
WITH
Num1 (n) AS (SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1),
Num2 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num1 AS X, Num1 AS Y),
Num3 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num2 AS X, Num2 AS Y),
Num4 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num3 AS X, Num3 AS Y),
Num5 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num4 AS X, Num4 AS Y),
Num6 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num5 AS X, Num5 AS Y),
Nums (n) AS
(SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY n)
FROM Num6)
SELECT n AS [Value] FROM Nums
WHERE n BETWEEN 1 AND @MaxValue;

This generally works very well and is fast but I have found its performance to be very poor when using a cross apply statement, eg

DECLARE @T TABLE(StartNum INT, ItemCount INT)
INSERT INTO @T VALUES (100, 5)
INSERT INTO @T VALUES (110, 7)
INSERT INTO @T VALUES (55, 3)

SELECT Seq.Value + StartNum FROM @T
CROSS APPLY he.SequenceCreate(ItemCount) AS Seq

This is very slow on my machine. Does anyone know why it works fine when executed once but runs very badly when executed 3 times via cross apply? Even if the @T table contains only 1 row the performance is still terrible. Is there a better way to write this?

Thanks in advance, Michael

share|improve this question
    
do the plans differ when fine and slow? –  Mitch Wheat Dec 12 '11 at 4:55
    
of doing a for loop in a SQL statement. - that would most likely also lead to very poor performance ... maybe you can re-architect your loops to use proper set-based SQL approaches and you might even eliminate the need for this proc all together... –  marc_s Dec 12 '11 at 6:09
    
Yes although I don't understand execution plans that well. When it is slow it looks like it is creating the maximum theoretical number of rows (2^32) and then filtering down from there. In the fast case it looks like it keeps the number of row low by filtering as it goes somehow (the plan doesn't really indicated why). The interesting this is I have a function that does basically the same thing but for dates and it works fine even though it calls the above function. –  MikeKulls Dec 12 '11 at 6:24
    
marc_s did you misread the question? This is a way of eliminating a for loop and use set based sql approach. –  MikeKulls Dec 12 '11 at 6:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The query optimizer figures it is better to only execute the function once and then use the result in a join to get the rows you want. It is done like that because your function is an inline table valued function. If you instead make your function a multi-statement valued function it will execute the function once for each row in your source table. However I would recommend that you create a numbers table instead as suggested by Igor.

CREATE FUNCTION [SequenceCreate]
(@MaxValue INT)
RETURNS @T TABLE ([Value] INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY)
AS
BEGIN

  WITH
  Num1 (n) AS (SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1),
  Num2 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num1 AS X, Num1 AS Y),
  Num3 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num2 AS X, Num2 AS Y),
  Num4 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num3 AS X, Num3 AS Y),
  Num5 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num4 AS X, Num4 AS Y),
  Num6 (n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM Num5 AS X, Num5 AS Y),
  Nums (n) AS
  (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY n)
  FROM Num6)
  INSERT INTO @T
  SELECT n AS [Value] FROM Nums
  WHERE n BETWEEN 1 AND @MaxValue;

  RETURN
END
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that fixed it. Why do you recommend a number table? It seems like the function is a simpler solution and not limited to the number of rows in the table. –  MikeKulls Dec 12 '11 at 22:59
    
@MikeKulls - I believe it would be a bit faster to use a table that already has the numbers instead of generating them for every query. Regarding the number of rows to keep in a numbers table I think 11000 is a good choice :). Ref: sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/62867 –  Mikael Eriksson Dec 13 '11 at 6:37
    
It makes sense that a table will have greater performance etc. I will stick with the function for now as it currently performs well enough for my uses and I like the way it has no practicle limit. –  MikeKulls Dec 13 '11 at 22:38

If you look at estimated execution plans of both of your queies you will see a lot of Constant Scans wich outputs are joined by Nested Loops.

In case of

select * from dbo.SequenceCreate (100)

Estimated number of rows for every Constant Scan is 1

In case of

SELECT N.N + StartNum 
FROM @T t
     left join Numbers AS N ON N.N<=T.ItemCount

Estimated number of rows for every Constant Scan is 2. So this is good example of geometric progression. The last Neste Loops returns 4294970000 rows - 36 GB. I cannot say why optimizer choose this plan but it choose it.

You can use following approach instead.

1 Create table with consecutiv numbers

CREATE TABLE Numbers(N INT PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1));
GO
INSERT INTO Numbers DEFAULT VALUES;
GO 1000 -- it takes about 2 minutes for 1000 but you need to execut it just once 

Use following script:

    DECLARE @T TABLE(StartNum INT, ItemCount INT)
    INSERT INTO @T VALUES (100, 5)
    INSERT INTO @T VALUES (110, 7)
    INSERT INTO @T VALUES (55, 3)

    SELECT N.N + StartNum 
    FROM @T t
         left join Numbers AS N ON N.N<=T.ItemCount
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