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I have a Perl script that interfaces with an existing database (type of database is unknown) through the DBI module, that I would like to access in python 2.6 on WinXP.

The Perl code is:

use DBI;
my $DSN = "DBI:Proxy:hostname=some.dot.com;port=12345;dsn=DBI:XXXX:ZZZZZ";
my $dbh = DBI->connect($DSN);  

Can this be translated into a python equivalent?

Following an example at (Is there any pywin32 odbc connector documentation available? ), I've put together the following:

import odbc
DSN = "DBI:Proxy:hostname=some.dot.com;port=12345;dsn=DBI:XXXX:ZZZZZ"
db = odbc.odbc(DSN)

But I get the error:

dbi.operation-error: [Microsoft][ODBC Driver Manager] Data source name not found and no default driver specified in LOGIN

UPDATE

It appears that another Perl module, DBD::Proxy is providing the actual interface to a Perl DBI::ProxyServer (server-side) implementation that handles the actual queries.

Can python be used to interface with the Perl-based DBI::ProxyServer?

http://search.cpan.org/~timb/DBI-1.608/lib/DBD/Proxy.pm http://hell.org.ua/Docs/oreilly/weblinux/dbi/ch08_02.htm

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Is the same Perl code running on the same Windows machine without errors? –  Swaroop C H May 11 '09 at 7:28
    
Good question. I'm working on getting DBI installed, which is another problem. –  monkut May 11 '09 at 8:04
3  
Both ActiveState and Strawberry Perl Windows distributions have DBI bundled with them. –  Alexandr Ciornii May 11 '09 at 9:43
    
Seems I'm missing the DBD::Proxy module, I'm working on getting that installed. –  monkut May 12 '09 at 2:13
    
I got the perl version of the script working now, no issues. –  monkut May 12 '09 at 8:28
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2 Answers

Your python script doesn't have to be a line by line translation of your Perl script.

Why not just use the Python DB-API compatible module for the database you want to access? For MySQL, use MySQLdb. For PostgreSQL, use PyGreSQL.

Or search Google for "YourDatabaseName + python"

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-1: "doesn't have to be a line-by-line translation" should be "can't be a line-by-line translation". –  S.Lott May 11 '09 at 11:07
    
What if I don't know the backend database? (I suppose I could try different modules). Does the Perl DBI module magically figure out the backend db from the given $DSN value? –  monkut May 12 '09 at 0:54
    
A database can never be consulted entirely generically... ports, connection protocols, sql syntax... all slightly different. The Python DB-API provides a common interface that each database's driver should implement so that the basics are as consistent as possible. Perl's DBI is the same... a layer of indirection designed to isolate each DB's (and DB-driver's) libraries. –  Jarret Hardie May 12 '09 at 1:05
1  
Yes, perl DBI automagically loads DBD::xx when asked to connect to a URL starting "dbi:xx:", so in this case DBD::Proxy. I guess the underlying problem is that DBD::Proxy isn't a real database driver, but a connector to talk to a bridge on some.dot.com whose dsn is (hopefully) a real database driver. Which is likely to use a DBD::Proxy-specific protocol. –  araqnid May 12 '09 at 1:36
1  
Yeah, it's looking difficult, I'll probably just end up using the perl. –  monkut May 12 '09 at 8:33
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sqlalchemy is pretty nice.

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Can sqlalchemy interface with a Perl DBI::ProxyServer? –  monkut May 13 '09 at 1:07
    
Why on earth would you want a Python DB framework to integrate with a perl DBI construct, especially given that there are perfectly functional database interfaces in Python? –  Jarret Hardie May 13 '09 at 1:21
    
sorry i clearly misunderstood the question. –  si28719e May 13 '09 at 12:05
    
or perhaps i just answered before that last line was added to the update. –  si28719e May 13 '09 at 12:14
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