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Is there any way to refer to the function object that you're currently executing in? If it's not a method of any object or not called with .call() or .apply(), the this pointer is likely just window, not the function object.

I often use a design pattern like this for global variables that I want scoped to a particular function as this keeps them out of the top level namespace:

function generateRandom() {
    if (!generateRandom.prevNums) {    
        generateRandom.prevNums = {};    // generateRandom.prevNums is a global variable
    }
    var random;
    do {
        random = Math.floor((Math.random() * (99999999 - 10000000 + 1)) + 10000000);
    } while (generateRandom.prevNums[random])
    generateRandom.prevNums[random] = true;
    return(random.toString());
}

But, I'd rather not have to spell out the function name every time I want to use a variable scoped to that object. If the name of the function ever changes, there are then a lot of places to change the name.

Is there any way to get the currently executing function object?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think there's any way to do exactly what you ask, but you could use a closure for your function-local static variables instead.

You can easily achieve this using an IIFE:

var generateRandom = (function() {
    //any function's static variables go here
    var prevNums = {};

    return function() {
        //function code goes here
        var random;
        do {
            random = Math....
        }

        prevNums[random] = true; 

        return random.toString();
    };
})();
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Closures are great for bundling up state and function ad-hoc and passing it along to some other thing... but I don't think it's an appropriate answer when the question was I often use a design pattern like this for global variables that I want scoped to a particular function as this keeps them out of the top level namespace... and ...there are then a lot of places to change the name. If there are so many places, the whole thing should get broken up into objects built using prototypes which define some methods and can use the this pointer. –  Steve Dec 12 '11 at 8:41
    
This looks like the most elegant way to solve the problem - thanks. It also has other advantages: 1) Removes dependency on the function name as asked, 2) initializing the variable is easier, 3) it can be referenced as a local variable without the long dot notation, 4) the variable is hidden/private from the outside world. Now, if I can just remember this syntax next time I need it. –  jfriend00 Dec 12 '11 at 20:00
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Well, you could use arguments.callee()...

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Functions_and_function_scope/arguments/callee

From MDN:

Description

callee is a property of the arguments object. It can be used to refer to the currently executing function inside the function body of that function. This is for example useful when you don't know the name of this function, which is for example the case with anonymous functions.

Note: You should avoid using arguments.callee() and just give every function (expression) a name.

BUT...

What you really want are Javascript Prototypes.

function RandomSomethingGenerator()
{
   this.prevNums = {};
}

RandomSomethingGenerator.prototype.generate = function() { 
    var random;
    do {
        random = Math.floor((Math.random() * (99999999 - 10000000 + 1)) + 10000000);
    } while (this.prevNums[random])
    this.prevNums[random] = true;
    return(random.toString());
};

Why do I say this?

1.) You're dirtying the global space with all those functions.

2.) Even if you like Jani's suggestion, and you want a "static" function like you have now, my suggestion would be the same, but with a twist: Create your global function, and wrap an instance of an object (built from a prototype) inside the closure and make the call to it (so, basically, make yourself a singleton).

As in this (adapted from Jani's answer):

var randomSomething = (function() {
    var randomSomethingGenerator = new RandomSomethingGenerator();

    return function() {
        randomSomethingGenerator.generate();
    };
})();
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That's not a prototype –  Jani Hartikainen Dec 12 '11 at 8:14
    
I confirmed that you cannot use arguments.callee in "strict mode". –  jfriend00 Dec 12 '11 at 8:26
    
Not saying you're wrong or anything about the rest, but that's making it more complicated by adding objects which aren't really doing anything when the code could just be in the function itself :) –  Jani Hartikainen Dec 12 '11 at 8:28
    
@JaniHartikainen Thanks. Typo fixed. –  Steve Dec 12 '11 at 8:28
    
@JaniHartikainen - Objects are an ideal way to couple state and function - which is exactly what the OP is trying to do. I'd say it's a pretty tried and true pattern by now - and easily recognized and understood by anyone coming along - not to mention easy to edit, maintain, and grow as the project gets bigger. –  Steve Dec 12 '11 at 8:29
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You want arguments.callee. From MDN - callee:

callee is a property of the arguments object. It can be used to refer to the currently executing function inside the function body of that function. This is for example useful when you don't know the name of this function, which is for example the case with anonymous functions.

For example:

> foo = function() { console.log(arguments.callee); };
> bar = function() { foo() };
> bar();
function () { console.log(arguments.callee) }

However, I think this is being deprecated. The above link says, "The 5th edition of ECMAScript forbids use of arguments.callee() in strict mode."

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