Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
int main(void)
{    
    char name[] = "t2.txt";  
    FILE *datei;  
    datei = fopen(name, "a+");

    fprintf(datei, "Hello");
    fclose(datei);

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

This program writes the word "hello" in the t2.txt file. to see this I should always open the file by myself. But I want to make the program which open it automatically at the end.. How can I do it? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
5  
I'm surprised this program does anything... – dreamlax Dec 12 '11 at 8:32
    
You answered your own question (that is, the one in the title), but I don't understand the one after your code. – wormsparty Dec 12 '11 at 8:36
    
Why the close votes? There were obviously some typos... – Luchian Grigore Dec 12 '11 at 8:37
1  
@wormsparty I think he automatically wants to open it in an editor to see the changes. – Luchian Grigore Dec 12 '11 at 8:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

That depends on your platform. For windows, you could use the system method:

int system ( const char * command );

with

system("notepad t2.txt");
share|improve this answer
int main(void)
{    
    char name[] = "t2.txt";  
    FILE *datei;  
    datei = fopen(name, "a+");

    fprintf(datei, "Hello");
    fclose(datei);

    system("cat t2.txt");//this will shows you content of file on your terminal
    return 0;
}

if you are working with linux then this is the GOOD way to do so ...i always do this

share|improve this answer
    
Why is this the best way to do it? (leaving aside the fact that you didn't answer the question - he said he wants to open the file, not print its contents to the console). "This is the best way to do it" is a pretty strong affirmation, you should have something to back it up. – Luchian Grigore Dec 12 '11 at 8:50
    
i thought by his question that after doing some file operation he wants to make sure whether that are done or not. so instead of opening file every time why dont just print the content of file on terminal and verify ..!!! in this way this is the best way... – Jeegar Patel Dec 12 '11 at 8:53
    
You just argued why you answered a different question... and I agree with you on this, this is what he might want. Regardless, you still haven't argued why this is the best way. – Luchian Grigore Dec 12 '11 at 8:56
    
okey i am removing the word "best" – Jeegar Patel Dec 12 '11 at 8:57
1  
Honestly, I'd avoid ever calling system(). It's easy to setup any build system to run a little script after the program run. It helps keep useless stuff out of your program, and isn't any less effective – Dave Dec 12 '11 at 9:21

The right thing to do in this situation is to wrap the command in a batch or shell script. That way, your program does what it's specified to do, and you get a nice automated review at the end

blah.sh:

#!/bin/sh
./program
cat t2.txt

Then, to run your program, you'd

./blah.sh
share|improve this answer

You'd have to talk to your operating system and tell it to open the file. This depends on the operating system, but usually you can do this with the system call which you'll find in stdlib.h, use the 'open' shell command.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.