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I'm trying to determine the best way to ping a database via JDBC. By 'best' I mean fast and low overhead. For example, I've considered executing this:

"SELECT 1 FROM DUAL"

but I believe the DUAL table is Oracle-specific, and I need something more generic.

Note that Connection has an isClosed() method, but the javadoc states that this cannot be used to test the validity of the connection.

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(I used SELECT @@VERSION on MS SQL Server, but that isn't even SQL.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 11 '09 at 9:59

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, that would be Oracle-only, but there is no generic way to do this in JDBC.

Most connection pool implementations have a configuration parameter where you can specify the SQL that will be used for ping, thus pushing the responsiblity to figure out how to do it to the user.

That seems like the best approach unless someone comes up with a little helper tool for this (of course, it precludes using potentially even faster non-SQL-based methods like Oracle's internal ping function)

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1  
SELECT 1 FROM DUAL works with MySQL also. –  Joset May 11 '09 at 8:59
2  
See my answer, JDBC 4 has a generic way (of cause not all drivers offer JDBC 4 yet). –  eckes Aug 31 '12 at 2:30

With JDBC 4 you can use isValid(int) (JavaDoc) from the Connection Interface. This basically does the trial statement for you.

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I'm not aware of a generic solution, either. For IBM's UDB on iSeries (and perhaps other DB2 systems) it would be

select 1 from SYSIBM.SYSDUMMY1;
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You could try to get the db name from the connection meta data and execute a matching sql staement. E.g.

Connection con = null;
Statement st = null;
ResultSet rs = null;
try {
  con = dataSource.getConnection();
  String dbProductName = con.getMetaData().getDatabaseProductName();
  Statement st = con.createStatement();
  if ( "PostgreSQL".equalsIgnoreCase(dbProductName) ) {
    rs = st.executeQuery("select version();");
  } else if ( "Oracle".equalsIgnoreCase(dbProductName) ) {
    rs = st.executeQuery("select 1 from dual");
  } else {
   ...
  }
} catch ( Exception ex ) {
  System.out.prinln("DB not reachable");
} finally {
   // close statement, connection etc.
   ...
}
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Simply issuing the following query should be sufficient

SELECT 1
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that will not work with Oracle... –  Thilo May 11 '09 at 9:14
1  
ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected –  Thilo May 11 '09 at 9:17

I may be out to lunch on this one, but could you simply execute some non-sense query, such as:

SELECT * FROM donkey_giraffe_87

I don't know very much about JDBC's error handling, but perhaps you could check to see if the database is at least telling you that the table does not exist. If JDBC's error codes are vendor-specific, the Spring Framework has some utilities for mapping these codes to more meaningful exceptions.

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It could be expensive to try to query a non-exisiting table. Dictionary cache misses and error handling code. –  Thilo May 11 '09 at 9:16

Can you not simply execute

SELECT 1

without a FROM clause against most databases?

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Not with Oracle: ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected –  Thilo May 11 '09 at 9:15

MySQL has a nice mechanism, documented in this SO answer. From the answer:

"/* ping */ SELECT 1"

This will actually cause the driver send a ping to the server and return a fake, light-weight, result set.

Having said that, @eckes answer is the best (using JDBC 4's Connection.isValid(int)).

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