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Implementing a datastructure with two function pointers, key_eq and key_hash. When these function pointers are set only once and never modified, I'd like gcc to compile in the function address directly instead of loading the struct member, however a single puts("") call will break gcc's constant propagation (correct term?).

Below is a short snippet of ppc asm. What is seen is that the field key_hash is stored, we call libc puts and then key_hash is loaded. If puts is removed, the constant is correctly propagated. Is this unavoidable?

    lis 9,hasheq_string@ha   # tmp174,                                       
    la 0,hasheq_string@l(9)  # tmp173,, tmp174                               
    stw 3,16(1)      # h.flags,                                              
    lis 9,hashf_string@ha    # tmp176,                                       
    lis 3,.LC0@ha    # tmp178,                                               
    stw 0,36(1)      # h.key_eq, tmp173                                      
    la 0,hashf_string@l(9)   # tmp175,, tmp176                               
    la 3,.LC0@l(3)   #,, tmp178                                              
    stw 0,40(1)      # h.key_hash, tmp175                                    
    bl puts  #                                                               
    lwz 0,40(1)      # h.key_hash, h.key_hash                                
    mr 3,31  #, tmp164                                                       
    stw 31,32(1)     # h._key, tmp164                                        
    mtctr 0  #, h.key_hash                                                   
    bctrl    #   

I'm sorry for not having a C testcase to go with it, I have a hard time reproducing it, yet the short three-line "store, bl puts, load" sequence leads the question, is this impossible to work around?

share|improve this question
    
I find it hard to believe that this results in a noticeable performance issue - do you have some really small functions in your library ? Could you not use inline functions instead ? –  Paul R Dec 12 '11 at 10:56
    
It's just the pattern that the function pointer member is not seen as constant/unchanged by gcc. 1) it should see that the function pointer member is only set once, to a constant value, and propagate this constant 2) only if this propagation happens, then it can inline the function pointer call if appropriate –  u0b34a0f6ae Dec 12 '11 at 11:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's possible that GCC conservatively assumes that the call to puts may read/write memory, hence the value in key_hash may be needed by the called function and different before and after the call.

This code:

struct S
{
  int f;
};

void bar ();

int
foo (struct S *s)
{
  s->f = 314;
  bar ();
  return s->f + 2;
}

produces the "signature" sequence:

foo:
    mflr 0
    stwu 1,-32(1)
    stw 29,20(1)
    mr 29,3
    stw 0,36(1)
    li 0,314
    stw 0,0(3)  ;;
    bl bar      ;; here we go
    lwz 3,0(29) ;;
    lwz 0,36(1)
    addi 3,3,2
    lwz 29,20(1)
    mtlr 0
    addi 1,1,32
    blr

However, with a small modification (manual Scalar Replacement of Aggregates?):

struct S
{
  int f;
};

void bar ();

int
foo (struct S *s)
{
  int i;

  s->f = i = 314;
  bar ();
  return i + 2;
}

one gets the desired result:

foo:
    mflr 0
    stwu 1,-16(1)
    stw 0,20(1)
    li 0,314
    stw 0,0(3)
    bl bar
    lwz 0,20(1)
    li 3,316    ;; constant propagated and folded
    addi 1,1,16
    mtlr 0
    blr
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for answering! I can't find any kind of annotation to make gcc assume it unchanged by "unknown" factors, especially const is not doing it. Any ideas? –  u0b34a0f6ae Dec 12 '11 at 13:12
    
@kaizer.se, it's puzzling to me too, even a restrict does not do the trick (granted, my ppc compiler is a rather old, 4.0.2). –  chill Dec 12 '11 at 16:54

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