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I heard (probably from a teacher) that one should declare all variables on top of the program/function, and that declaring new ones among the statements could cause problems.

But then I was reading K&R and I came across this sentence: "Declarations of variables (including initializations) may follow the left brace that introduces any compound statement, not just the one that begins a function". He follows with an example:

if (n > 0){
    int i;
    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
    ...
}

I played a bit with the concept, and it works even with arrays. For example:

int main(){
    int x = 0 ;

    while (x<10){
        if (x>5){
            int y[x];
            y[0] = 10;
            printf("%d %d\n",y[0],y[4]);
        }
        x++;
    }
}

So when exactly I am not allowed to declare variables? For example, what if my variable declaration is not right after the opening brace? Like here:

int main(){
    int x = 10;

    x++;
    printf("%d\n",x);

    int z = 6;
    printf("%d\n",z);
}

Could this cause trouble depending on the program/machine?

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1  
gcc is pretty lax. You're using c99 variable length arrays and declarations. Compile with gcc -std=c89 -pedantic and you'll get yelled at. According to c99, though, all that's kosher. –  Dave Dec 12 '11 at 12:23
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4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I also often hear that puting variables at the top of the function is the best way to do things, but I strongly disagree. I prefer to confine variables to the smallest scope possible so they have less chance to be mis-used and so I have less stuff filling up my mental space at each line on the program.

While all versions of C allow lexical block scope, where you can declare the variables depends of the version of the C standard that you are targeting. If you need to target ANSI C (C89( then you must declare variables immediately after an opening brace. If you are targeting C99 or C++ the you can declare variables in the middle of a block as well (and the its scope extends until the end of said block).

Note that you may need to set some flags to force your compiler to be enforce the standard of your choice, without triggering extra extensions. For example, gcc demands -ansi (to use the ANSI standard and) -pedantic (to disable extensions) in order to complain about the variables declared in the middle of a block.


In ANSI C (C89) you are limited to declaring variables just after an opening brace. This limitation is mostly an annoyiance though, since you can introduce a brand new block whenever a statement could go.

int main()
{
    printf("%d\n", 17);

    {
        int z = 6;
        printf("%d\n",z);
    }
}

Variables are confined to the block they were created in so they cannot be accessed outside it. In C++ there is also some extra magic since the end of the block triggers destructors. This means that "extraneous" code blocks can be used to manage code that does things on destruction (like freeing a resource, for example).

From C99 onwards (and C++) the standard also allows variables to be declared inside for loops

 //C99
for(int i=0; i<10; i++){}

//equivalent in ANSI C
{int i; for(i=0; i<10; i++){} }

and in the middle of the blocks

//C99
printf("%d", 17);
int z=42;
printf("%d", z);

//ANSI C
printf("%d", 17);
{
 int z=42;
 printf("%d", z);
}
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2  
+1 for the very first sentence alone. –  bitmask Dec 12 '11 at 12:51
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missingno covers what ANSI C allows, but he doesn't address why your teachers told you to declare your variables at the top of your functions. Declaring variables in odd places can make your code harder to read, and that can cause bugs.

Take the following code as an example.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int i, j;
    i = 20;
    j = 30;

    printf("(1) i: %d, j: %d\n", i, j);

    {
        int i;
        i = 88;
        j = 99;
        printf("(2) i: %d, j: %d\n", i, j);
    }

    printf("(3) i: %d, j: %d\n", i, j);

    return 0;
}

As you can see, I've declared i twice. Well, to be more precise, I've declared two variables, both with the name i. You might think this would cause an error, but it doesn't, because the two i variables are in different scopes. You can see this more clearly when you look at the output of this function.

(1) i: 20, j: 30
(2) i: 88, j: 99
(3) i: 20, j: 99

First, we assign 20 and 30 to i and j respectively. Then, inside the curly braces, we assign 88 and 99. So, why then does the j keep its value, but i goes back to being 20 again? It's because of the two different i variables.

Between the inner set of curly braces the i variable with the value 20 is hidden and inaccessible, but since we have not declared a new j, we are still using the j from the outer scope. When we leave the inner set of curly braces, the i holding the value 88 goes away, and we again have access to the i with the value 20.

Sometimes this behavior is a good thing, other times, maybe not, but it should be clear that if you use this feature of C indiscriminately, you can really make your code confusing and hard to understand.

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2  
You made your code hard to read because you used the very same name for two variables, not because you declared variables not at the beginning of the function. Those are two different problems. I strongly disagree with the statement that declaring variables in other places make your code hard to read, I think the opposite is true. When writing code, if you declare the variable near when it's going to be used, following the principle of temporal and spacial locality, when reading, you will be able to identify what it does, why is there and how it is used very easy. –  Havok Jan 3 at 20:47
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If your compiler allows it then its fine to declare anywhere you want. In fact the code is more readable (IMHO) when you declare the variable where you use instead of at the top of a function because it makes it easier to spot errors e.g. forgetting to initialize the variable or accidently hiding the variable.

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You can declare variables wherever you want to declare. But, there comes the scope of variables. If you define just after the main() function, you can use it inside the whole main function but not outside of it. If you declare it somewhere in the mid, then you won't be able to use it from that declaration. It is a good practice to declare just after the main() function so that you could use it anywhere in the main() without getting any error.

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