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I know I can do the below with a foreach but was wondering if there is a clean and "sexier" way of doing this with LINQ.

public class item
{
    public int total { get; set; }
    public int net { get; set; }
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<item> items = new List<item>()
                               {
                                   new item() { total = 123, net = 423},
                                   new item() { total = 432, net = 54},
                                   new item() { total = 33, net = 57654},
                                   new item() { total = 33, net = 423},
                                   new item() { total = 3344, net = 423},
                                   new item() { total = 123, net = 423},
                                   new item() { total = 123, net = 98},
                                   new item() { total = 123, net = 867},
                                   new item() { total = 123, net = 876},
                                   new item() { total = 123, net = 423},
                                   new item() { total = 123, net = 543},
                                   new item() { total = 543, net = 345},
                               };

        item i = new item();
        foreach (var item in items)
        {
            i.net += item.net;
            i.total += item.total;
        }
    }
}

What I would like to do is, for a given list of objects sum each of the columns / fields and return one single object with the sum of each value.

I tried:

var result = (from e in items
                     select new
                                {
                                    NET_GRAND = e.net,
                                    TOTAL_GRAND = e.total
                                }).ToList();

And variations on the below but with no luck:

 var result = (from t in items
                     group t by new {t.net, t.total}
                     into grp
                     select new
                                {
                                    NET_GRAND = grp.Sum(t => t.net),
                                    TOTAL_GRAND = grp.Sum(t => t.total)
                                }).GroupBy(x => new { x.NET_GRAND, x.TOTAL_GRAND }).ToList();

EDIT

should have pointed out that efficiency is important here as well as sexiness.

share|improve this question
    
The most efficient solution is the one you already have. Any LINQ-based solution here will be using LINQ just for the sake of using LINQ. – Adam Robinson Dec 12 '11 at 13:43
up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you don't care about iterating the list twice,

var i = new item
    { 
        net = items.Sum(it => it.net), 
        total = items.Sum(it => it.total) 
    };

If you do care about iterating the list twice (as you might be if you were doing this for an IEnumerable of unknown origin),

var i = items.Aggregate(new item(), 
    (accumulator, it) => 
        new item 
        {
            net = accumulator.net + it.net, 
            total = accumulator.total + it.total 
        } 
);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the use of Aggregate (I just finished writing my own when I saw this posted), though I might suggest using another type for the accumulator to make it explicit what is going on. It's also worth noting to the OP that this is definitely not "sexier" than a simple foreach in this particular case. – Adam Robinson Dec 12 '11 at 13:10
    
agreed on the not so sexy but way more efficient if you have an object with a large number of fields. – Jon Dec 12 '11 at 13:29
1  
@Jon: In what way is this more efficient than the foreach? This does the same thing as the foreach but requires an additional intermediate object and delegate invocation. Neither of those is particularly punishing from a performance perspective, but they certainly don't make it more efficient. I agree, though, that from the answers presented this is the one I'd use. – Adam Robinson Dec 12 '11 at 13:38
    
@AdamRobinson sorry for the miss understanding I don't think it would be more efficient but more elegant with "LINQYNESS", just didn't want to do multiple linq iterations if avoidable.. or just foreaching – Jon Dec 12 '11 at 13:46

It looks like you really want:

var result = new {
    NetGrand = items.Sum(t => t.net),
    TotalGrand = items.Sum(t => t.total)
};

On the other hand, I'd probably just separate those into two different local variables:

var netGrand = items.Sum(t => t.net);
var totalGrand = items.Sum(t => t.total);

Of course this iterates over the list twice, but in most cases I'd expect that not to be noticeable.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Jon, Will this do an iteration for each variable? i.e. if we have a large object will it become inefficient? – Jon Dec 12 '11 at 13:27
1  
@Jon: It will iterate over the list twice, yes. But "inefficient" is a relative term - what you're interested in is whether it's fast enough. – Jon Skeet Dec 12 '11 at 13:34
    
In most cases, yes, but this is no more concise than the original foreach version. While "fast enough" is a good metric when comparing approaches that differ on other grounds, it seems here like it would be choosing something with clearly poorer performance without gaining anything. – Adam Robinson Dec 12 '11 at 13:40
    
@AdamRobinson: Will edit with the two-separate-variables version, which is more concise :) – Jon Skeet Dec 12 '11 at 13:45
item totals = new item 
              { 
                 net = items.Sum(i => i.net),
                 total = items.Sum(i => i.total)  
              };

But keep in mind that this query will enumerate a list two times, so for a large list this would not so efficient as old good single foreach loop.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for pointing out the (somewhat obvious) fact that this requires two traversals. – Adam Robinson Dec 12 '11 at 13:05
var item = new item();
item.net = items .Sum(x=>x.net);
item.total = items.Sum(x=>x.total);
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you creating a new instance of item? – Adam Robinson Dec 12 '11 at 13:15
1  
@Adam Robinson, because OP want's create a new item and fill its property, I don't know why you asked this? Is there any other answer here without creating new instance of item? – Saeed Amiri Dec 13 '11 at 13:27

Use the foreach loop. You state that you are concerned about efficiency, and even if you weren't there is no reason to write it using Linq just to be using Linq.

One of the things we discover as we get lots more experience with programs is that just because something is done "the old way" does not make it bad. And converting to the new-wiz-bang method does not make it better. In fact, if you have code working the old way, "upgrading" is a cause for injection of defects, with in many cases no advantages.

At best, this Linq method will take 2X longer to compute.

var i = new item
    { 
        net = items.Sum(it => it.net), 
        total = items.Sum(it => it.total) 
    };

Not sure about the aggregate method, but clearly it will take longer.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no real advantage in using a loop here over Sum. Sum is shorter, more concise, semantically represents exactly the operation that should be performed, performs that operation quite efficiently and without a particularly significant overhead. It's highly unlikely that the LINQ approach would be anywhere near 2X slower. They would both be performing an effectively identical overhead. There would be a touch of overhead for iterating the sequence twice and for the use of a delegate, but both should be rather minimal. – Servy Jul 30 '14 at 18:14
1  
Would not the TWO linq queries have to iterate over list twice? Where the foreach (or a for) loop would do it once? In order to take the same amount of time, the linq would have to iterate twice as fast. The code for the foreach loop is 1 line of code more - and that line of code is only needed if you want to build up an object with the results. Otherwise it is using a += in the loop instead of a = items.sum. BTW: I use Linq all the time, so I agree that it is a nice and concise way to write code. My only point is that it is slower. (I work with high performance code.) – Traderhut Games Jul 30 '14 at 20:59
    
It does do the work twice as fast, and that's because it's doing half as much work. Which of these code snippets is faster: 1) foreach(var item in list){Thread.Sleep(1000);Thread.Sleep(1000);} 2) foreach(var item in list)Thread.Sleep(1000);foreach(var item in list)Thread.Sleep(1000);? One loop that performs two additions per iteration is going to take twice as long as two loops performing one addition per iteration. – Servy Jul 30 '14 at 21:01
1  
In terms of timing, I expect the getting the next iterator value is the sleep(1000), as a var+= value (with the compiler putting that in a register) is going to take 1 ns. or less actual time, vs calling an iterator to get the next object in a list. Just wrote a program to test it: Time using Linq: 0.947901695658294ms Time using For: 0.496631422516865ms – Traderhut Games Jul 30 '14 at 21:19
    
timer.Start(); var i = new Foo() { val1 = FooList.Sum(it => it.val1), val2 = FooList.Sum(it => it.val2) }; timer.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(@"Time using Linq: {0}ms", timer.DurationMilli); timer.Start(); Foo resultFoo = new Foo(); foreach (Foo f in FooList) { resultFoo.val1 += f.val1; resultFoo.val2 += f.val2; }; timer.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(@"Time using For: {0}ms", timer.DurationMilli); – Traderhut Games Jul 30 '14 at 21:20

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