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I got the entire HTTP response as a string but I want to extract just the body.

I would prefer not to use an external library or reimplement the header parsing.

Content-Type: text/xml
Content-Length: 129

<?xml version='1.0'?>
<methodResponse>
<params>
<param>
<value><boolean>0</boolean></value>
</param>
</params>
</methodResponse>
</code>

Update: If it wasn't obvious, I do get the data from other source than an URL so any attempt to use something that requires and URL is useless.

Still I do read the data from a stream like object data = stream.read(), so a solution that can use a stream is also acceptable.

2nd update, yes this is a XMLRPC response but it's one that I'm getting using a different transport so I cannot use httplib to parse it, mainly because httplib is broken and not accepting strings or streams for parsing.

3rd update, the double newline can be \r\n\r\n or \n\n based on the server.

So to make it clear: the input is a HTTP response that is supposed to contain an XMLRPC response and the output has to be the response. It doesn't have to parse the XML, but it has to be able to properly extract the XML from the response.

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1  
And what about minidom library which is built-in ? –  Stan Dec 12 '11 at 13:04
1  
Why didn't you use urllib or httplib? –  larsmans Dec 12 '11 at 13:08
1  
That is a XMLRPC response so you should use xmlrpclib –  Jochen Ritzel Dec 12 '11 at 13:12
    
@sorin : How about try something by yourself before asking ? The Python Minidom doc is cristal clear and getting the content of a XML tag is not demanding so much effort... –  Stan Dec 12 '11 at 13:26
    
@sorin Are you sure the case "\r\n\r\r" exist ? If so, why not also "\r\r\r\r", "\r\r", "\n\n\n\r".... ? –  eyquem Dec 14 '11 at 18:58
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on Michal solution but this one includes and essential fix:

def strip_http_headers(http_reply):
    p = http_reply.find('\r\n\r\n')
    if p >= 0:
        return http_reply[p+4:]
    return http_reply
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In HTTP response headers are separated from body by two CRLF characters. So you can use string.find() method like this:

p = http_reply.find('\r\n\r\n')
if p >= 0:
    return http_reply[p:]
return http_reply
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+1 for precision on two CRLF that I didn't know –  eyquem Dec 13 '11 at 0:08
    
bogdan solution with +4 is better. Also sometime you can find HTTP server that use two LF instead of two CRLF. –  Michał Niklas Dec 13 '11 at 6:46
add comment
resp = ('Content-Type: text/xml\r\n'
        'Content-Length: 129\r\n'
        "<?xml version='1.0'?>\r\n"
        '\r\n'
        '<methodResponse>\r\n'
        '<params>\r\n'
        '<param>\r\n'
        '<value><boolean>0</boolean></value>\r\n'
        '</param>\r\n'
        '</params>\r\n'
        '</methodResponse>\r\n'
        '</code>')

print resp.partition('\r\n\r\n')[2]

result

<methodResponse>
<params>
<param>
<value><boolean>0</boolean></value>
</param>
</params>
</methodResponse>
</code>

On my display, the characters '\r' appear as squares at the end of each line.

The advantage of partition() is that it returns ALWAYS a tuple of 3 elements:
then, if there is not the sequence '\r\n\r\n' in the text,
resp.partition('\r\n\r\n')[2] will be ""
while split('\r\n\r\n')[1] causes an error and split('\r\n\r\n')[-1] is the entire text.

EDIT

If the double newline is variable, only a regex can hold the variability.
It is necessary to know what is the span of variability to craft a regex pattern.

Supposing that only "\n\n", "\r\n\n", "\n\r\n" and "\r\n\r\n" are possible , a solution would be to catch the body with help of the regex based on following pattern :

import re

regx = re.compile('(?:(?:\r?\n){2}|\Z)(.+)?',re.DOTALL)

for ss in (('Content-Type: text/xml\r\n'
            'Content-Length: 129\r\n'
            "<?xml version='1.0'?>\n"
            '\n'
            'body1\r\n'
            '<params>\r\n'
            '<param>\r\n'
            '</code>') ,
           ('Content-Type: text/xml\r\n'
            'Content-Length: 129\r\n'
            "<?xml version='1.0'?>\r\n"
            '\n'
            'body2\r\n'
            '<params>\r\n'
            '<param>\r\n'
            '</code>') ,
           ('Content-Type: text/xml\r\n'
            'Content-Length: 129\r\n'
            "<?xml version='1.0'?>\n"
            '\r\n'
            'body3\r\n'
            '<params>\r\n'
            '<param>\r\n'
            '</code>') ,
           ('Content-Type: text/xml\r\n'
            'Content-Length: 129\r\n'
            "<?xml version='1.0'?>\r\n"
            '\r\n'
            'body4\r\n'
            '<params>\r\n'
            '<param>\r\n'
            '</code>') ,
           ('Content-Type: text/xml\r\n'
            'Content-Length: 129\r\r'
            "<?xml version='1.0'?>\r\r"
            '\r\n'
            'body4\r\n'
            '<params>\r\n'
            '<param>\r\n'
            '</code>') ,):
    print ('splitting on sequence  :  %r\n%r\n') \
           % (re.search('(?:\r?\n)+(?=body)',ss).group(),
              regx.search(ss).group(1))

result

splitting on sequence  :  '\n\n'
'body1\r\n<params>\r\n<param>\r\n</code>'

splitting on sequence  :  '\r\n\n'
'body2\r\n<params>\r\n<param>\r\n</code>'

splitting on sequence  :  '\n\r\n'
'body3\r\n<params>\r\n<param>\r\n</code>'

splitting on sequence  :  '\r\n\r\n'
'body4\r\n<params>\r\n<param>\r\n</code>'

splitting on sequence  :  '\r\n'
None
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Short and sweet:

body = response.split('\r\n\r\n', 1)[-1]

(it uses two argument version of split() and [-1] means last element of array)

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Not that sweet. I have seen many HTML/XML pages with many empty lines. response.partition() proposed by eyquem is better. –  Michał Niklas Dec 13 '11 at 6:49
    
@Michał Niklas I don't understand what you want to say. Thanks to the 1 argument, split('\r\n\r\n', 1) splits only according the first occurence of "\r\n\r\n" : if there are more such sequences after, they are in the body of the text that is obtained, they don't bother. - The only drawback I see for this solution is that in case there is no sequence "\r\n\r\n", it returns the whole text, and there is no other possibility to detect this case than to compare len(response) and len(response.split('\r\n\r\n', 1)[-1]), which makes the solution less light. –  eyquem Dec 14 '11 at 18:50
    
You are right. I haven't seen that this is two argument version of split(). –  Michał Niklas Dec 14 '11 at 21:14
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You can use standard urllib2:

from urllib2 import urlopen
data = urlopen('http://url.here/').read()

And if you want to parse xml:

from urllib2 import urlopen
from xml.dom.minidom import parse

xml = parse(urlopen('http://url.here'))
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Besides what Tito said, there's also the requests package

>>> import requests
>>> r = requests.get("http://yoururl")
>>> r
<Response [200]>
>>> r.content
...

And then parse it with minidom or whatever tool you choose for that.

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