Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm implementing INotifyPropertyChanged in a base class as follows:

public class NotifyPropertyChangedBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected virtual void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var propChangedHandler = PropertyChanged;

        if (propChangedHandler != null)
        {
            var args = new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName);
            propChangedHandler(this, args);
        }
    }
}

I'm using it as follows:

RaisePropertyChanged("Name");

I'm getting a NullReferenceException while the arguments, "this" and the handler are NOT null. Can anyone shed some light on this?

Thanks.

-> Full stacktrace of the exception: http://pastebin.com/bH9FeurJ

UPDATE The exception occurs when I overwrite an instance of the class which contains this property. Simplified example:

public class Person : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string _name;
    public string Name
    {
        get { return _name; }
        set
        {
            _name = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("Name");
        }
    }

// More properties etc.
}

-snip-

public class ViewModel
{
    private Person _dummyPerson;
    public Person DummyPerson
    {
        get { return _dummyPerson; }
        set
        {
            _dummyPerson = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("DummyPerson");
        }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        DummyPerson = new DummyPerson(); 
        // this line throws the NRE, strangly enough the very FIRST time it works fine
    }
}

-snip-

I'm using this DummyPerson and its Name property to databind to the UI. The second and all following attempts thereafter result in the NullReferenceException.

share|improve this question
    
does the property Name exist? –  BrokenGlass Dec 12 '11 at 14:48
    
Yes, Name exists :) –  Rumble Dec 14 '11 at 13:53
    
Was there ever a solution to this? I'm experiencing this problem right now. –  Bob Horn Feb 24 '12 at 20:05
    
Nope I didn't find it, although i'm sure it was some problem in IIS - I ended up reinstalling the whole OS from scratch :| –  Rumble Feb 26 '12 at 14:26
add comment

2 Answers

The exception isn't raised in your sample code, it is raised in one of the subscribed event handlers. Go through it step by step in debugger or turn on the switch "Thrown" for "Common Language Runtime Exceptions" in "Debug" - "Exceptions" menu of Visual Studio. Then you will be able to find out the reason.

share|improve this answer
    
I cannot step into the code any deeper, it automatically steps over. The switch you mention is also on and throws the error at the above-mentioned line. –  Rumble Dec 12 '11 at 15:37
add comment

Looking at the stack-trace, it's clear that the NullReferenceException isn't being thrown here at all; it's actually being thrown deeper, at:

 GalaSoft.MvvmLight.Command.RelayCommand`1.Execute(Object parameter)

Essentially, a dependency of one of the event-listeners is misbehaving.

Aside: I wasn't quite sure if the stack-trace convention you are using is the 'grow-up' or 'grow-down' kind. Once I saw that the method just above yoir method was the delegate invocation:

System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventHandler.Invoke(Object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)

...it was clear that the stack was indeed growing 'up'.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the first (deepest) step is at the top, while the final step before the exception is at the bottom; from VS2010. –  Rumble Dec 12 '11 at 15:35
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.