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Background/Question:

I'm fairly new to the singleton design pattern. I've used it once in a web application (with the help of the SO community):

public static AppGlobal Instance
{
    get
    {
        if (HttpContext.Current.Session != null)
        {
            HttpSessionState session = HttpContext.Current.Session;

            if (session["AppGlobalInstance"] == null)
            {
                session["AppGlobalInstance"] = new AppGlobal();
            }

            return (AppGlobal)session["AppGlobalInstance"];
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

The above implementation makes sense to me because the instance of the AppGlobal is stored in the session. When the session dies, AppGlobal dies. What happens if I use the same design pattern in a class library that is called by a web application? For example, the users requests a page that calls methods in a DLL that doesn't know about the session. Will the data stored in the singleton instance be persisted through multiple calls?

private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
private Singleton() { }

public static Singleton Instance
{
    get
    {
        return instance;
    }
}

Additional Information:

Here's what I'm trying to accomplish: I have a web application that is going to receive XML requests from a third party application. This XML will tell my web application to do one of three things (or all three of them). I would like to have a singleton instance of a class that stores data that can be accessed by multiple classes. I want the singleton instance to DIE after each request. If the above doesn't accomplish this, what's the best way to accomplish it?

Note: This web application runs on a single server and will never run on a farm.

EDIT 1:

Based on the suggestion below, I've used System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Session to store my class instance. Does this look like the correct approach for a singleton that will be unique to each session (remember I'm in a class library)?

    public static Ariba Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current.Session != null)
            {
                HttpSessionState session = HttpContext.Current.Session;

                if (session["AribaInstance"] == null)
                {
                    session["AribaInstance"] = new Ariba();
                }

                return (Ariba)session["AribaInstance"];
            }
            else
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
You mention that you'd like the singleton to die after each request. If that's the case, you don't need to store anything in the session. Instead, you can just store your object in HttpContext.Current.Items["AribaInstance"]. I'll add that if you do use HttpContext.Current, you'll have some difficulties unit testing your class library since HttpContext.Current won't be populated outside of ASP.NET (this is also true of Session.) If unit testing is important to you, you'll need to wrap the context and session objects. –  Andy Wilson Dec 12 '11 at 17:56
    
@AndyWilson, Thanks for the heads up, and for the answer! –  James Hill Dec 12 '11 at 18:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It will be persisted through multiple calls, but there is one caveat. The static variables are scoped to the AppDomain, so any time the IIS worker process is recycled, any data stored in a static variable will be lost. The same is true of session data, if you're storing it "in proc."

If you want an object that will only exist for the duration of the HTTP request, you can use the HttpContext.Items property.

share|improve this answer

Because the singleton is static, your data will be available for all the requests in your web application, so it will not be available only for the session.

But in ASP.NET applications, you should avoid using Singletons. Instead you should use the Application object. Main reason for that is that if you will use a web farm then your singleton is no longer singelton for the application scope but only on the machine.

share|improve this answer
    
You idea of using Application state in a farm is wrong, did you mean session state? –  felickz Dec 12 '11 at 15:13
    
Scalability - Application state is not shared among multiple servers serving the same application, as in a Web farm, or among multiple worker processes serving the same application on the same server, as in a Web garden. Your application therefore cannot rely on application state containing the same data for application state across different servers or processes. If your application will run in multi-processor or multi-server environments, consider using a more scalable option, such as a database, for data that must preserve fidelity across the application. –  felickz Dec 12 '11 at 15:14
    

Oh! If you want to use the instance PER REQUEST, why don't you pass it as a parameter to the methods you are calling or as a constructor parameter for the classes that requires the xml. This will be the best design approach, I think.

share|improve this answer
    
I've thought about this but I don't want to add 8 parameters to the signature of every method I create. –  James Hill Dec 12 '11 at 15:11
1  
In that case it is time to start thinking about using dependency injection. Most DI frameworks allow you to configure objects with a 'per web request' lifestyle and they will inject it into types that depend on it. This saves you from having to pass it to all methods down the call stack (which is called method injection). –  Steven Dec 12 '11 at 15:16
    
Ok. Suppose you don't want to add them to the constructor. You can have one class with those 8 dependencies and pass only that one in the signature. With this kind of approach it's easy to run unit tests over it. If you want to continue sticky to a kind of "static" way to get them, you will need to put the objects in the HttpContext.Current.Items collection: public static MyObject { get { return (MyObject)HttpContext.Current.Items["MyObject"];} set { HttpContext.Current.Items.Add("MyObject",value); } } HttpContext.Current.Items is a dictionary that lives in the request only. –  ivowiblo Dec 14 '11 at 5:47
    
You may need to clear (maybe dispose some of those objects?) on the Request_end event of your application (i.e. in the global.asax file) –  ivowiblo Dec 14 '11 at 5:48

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