Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have multiple table in which i'm showing comments. Each table have same elements. I want to click "reply" button and select the id="comment-id. $row['id'] .'" by using jquery

       <tr>
         <td align="right" colspan="9" id="reply-td">
             <input type="button" class="reply" name="reply" value="reply" title="reply" />
            </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td align="left" colspan="9">
                <input id="comment-id'. $row['id'] .'" type="hidden" value=""/>
                <input id="respond'. $row['id'] .'" type="hidden" value=""/>
            </td>
        </tr>
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is it the only "comment-id..."-field? In that case you might do something like

var field = $('input[id^="comment-id"]');

Is it the only one in that table? In that case you could do

$('.reply').click(function() {
    var field = $(this).closest('table').find('input[id^="comment-id"]');
});

Is it neither of those? Well, then, you might do something like this:

$('.reply').click(function() {
    var field = $(this).closest('tr').next('tr').find('input[id^="comment-id"]');
});

What specific approach will work best for you can only be decided if we know exactly what assumptions you are willing to make about your DOM.

If altering the DOM isn't out of the question, then first of all, I would add classes to the hidden fields for ease of access (.comment-id over input[^="comment-id"]). You might also, if your DOM is entirely unpredictable and none of the above approaches appeal to you, add id="reply'. $row['id'] .'" to your reply button, so that you could parse the ID from there, and do this:

$('.reply').click(function() {
    var field = $('#comment-id' + $(this).attr('id').replace('reply',''));
});

Again, the best approach depends on what relations you know that you can rely on to always exist.

share|improve this answer
add comment
$("input[id=^'comment-id']").click(function() {
  alert($(this).attr("id"));
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

In addition to @David Hedlund's answer, I might also want to be safe, depending on the context:

$('.reply').click(function(evt) {
    evt.preventDefault();
    var field = $(this).closest('table').find('input[id^="comment-id"]');
});
share|improve this answer
    
It's an input type="button", though, so what do you expect would happen? Sure, that might be preventing some other listener that he has assigned, but we may equally well say that whatever other action that button has been instructed to perform, for all we know, that action may still be desired. –  David Hedlund Dec 12 '11 at 15:27
    
very true, that's why I noted: "depending on the context" –  Dele Dec 12 '11 at 15:31
    
Sure, I just reckon that's about as useful as saying "depending on the context, you might want to call $('img').hide()." For all we know, he might also want to hide all images, right? I don't mean to be sarcastic, I just find the context you're talking about to be an awfully arbitrary one, that we have no reason to assume any more than, well, a context in which all images should be hidden. And we can't really hint about extra code that might be useful in all imaginable contexts, can we? –  David Hedlund Dec 12 '11 at 15:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.