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Working in c# i've found very useful two static methods of the String class :

i can't find a valid surrogate in Java, is there something similar ?

Actually i have translated the two methods in this way :

public static boolean isNullOrEmpty(String a) {
return a == null || a.isEmpty();
} 

public static boolean isNullOrWhiteSpace(String a) {
return a == null || (a.length() > 0 && a.trim().length() <= 0);
}

Is this the best way to translate these methods in Java ? What is the best way to translate these two methods in Java ?

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1  
This might be the answer for you: stackoverflow.com/q/2272169/681807 –  My Head Hurts Dec 12 '11 at 15:26
4  
Your second implementation is not exactly the same. An empty string will return false whereas the C# one returns true. You could remove the a.length() > 0 && and it would be the same. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 12 '11 at 15:29

9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I would prefer not to use String.trim to check for existence of whitespace. It is doing more work than you need, since it checks both ends of the string (even if non-whitespace was found at the other end) AND it returns a new String object. So I would prefer to implement a method to check for whitespace only.

So my suggestion (if implementing yourself) would be as follows:

public static boolean isNullOrEmpty(String s) {
    return s == null || s.length() == 0;
}

public static boolean isNullOrWhitespace(String s) {
    return s == null || isWhitespace(s);

}
private static boolean isWhitespace(String s) {
    int length = s.length();
    if (length > 0) {
        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            if (!Character.isWhitespace(s.charAt(i))) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Or taking a queue from String.trim's implementation, you could use char comparison rather than Character.isWhitespace():

// checking for whitespace like String.trim() does
private static boolean isWhitespace(String s) {
    int length = s.length();
    if (length > 0) {
        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            if (s.charAt(i) > ' ') {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Finally, I'd consider checking both ends of the string in each iteration, stepping inwards. This would minimize the number of iterations needed to get the answer, regardless of whether whitespace exists at the front or the end of the string.

private static boolean isWhitespace(String s) {
    int length = s.length();
    if (length > 0) {
        for (int start = 0, middle = length / 2, end = length - 1; start <= middle; start++, end--) {
            if (s.charAt(start) > ' ' || s.charAt(end) > ' ') {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
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Seems the most complete answer, Thanks. –  aleroot Dec 12 '11 at 18:04
    
Your implementation if IsNullOrWhitespace will return false if the string is empty, which doesn't match c#'s implementation. Here's an implementation that does: gist.github.com/jamiegs/5391961 –  Jamiegs Apr 15 '13 at 22:55
    
Jamiegs is right. Because your are using an IsWhiteSpace method, and you could argue that "" is not whitespace but empty, then you could add a check for empty string. public static boolean isNullOrWhitespace(String s) { return s == null || s == "" || isWhitespace(s); } –  Rhyous Feb 22 '14 at 20:39

You can always see c#'s implementation through .net reflector or other decompiler:

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(string value)
{
  if (value != null)
    return value.Length == 0;
  else
    return true;
}

and

public static bool IsNullOrWhiteSpace(string value)
{
  if (value == null)
    return true;
  for (int index = 0; index < value.Length; ++index)
  {
    if (!char.IsWhiteSpace(value[index]))
      return false;
  }
  return true;
}
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you can try like this

import org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils;

public class CheckEmptyStringExample 
{  
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
     String string1 = "";
     String string2 = "\t\r\n";
     String string3 = " ";
     String string4 = null;
     String string5 = "Hi"; 
     System.out.println("\nString one is empty? " + StringUtils.isBlank(string1));
     System.out.println("String one is not empty? " + StringUtils.isNotBlank(string1));
     System.out.println("\nString two is empty? " +  StringUtils.isBlank(string2));
     System.out.println("String two is not empty?" + StringUtils.isNotBlank(string2));
     System.out.println("\nString three is empty?" + StringUtils.isBlank(string3));
     System.out.println("String three is not empty?" + StringUtils.isNotBlank(string3));
     System.out.println("\nString four is empty?" +  StringUtils.isBlank(string4));
     System.out.println("String four is not empty?" + StringUtils.isNotBlank(string4));
     System.out.println("\nString five is empty?" + StringUtils.isBlank(string5));
     System.out.println("String five is not empty?" + StringUtils.isNotBlank(string5)); 
  }
}
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Have a look at the StringUtils class in apache commons lang.

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Apache Commons Lang has a vary handy set of utilities for strings: http://commons.apache.org/lang/api-release/org/apache/commons/lang3/StringUtils.html

Of course your implementation can suffice if you don't want to bother with dependencies.

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If you import com.google.common.base.Strings, you have Strings.isNullOrEmpty()

isNullOrEmpty(@Nullable String string)
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No such methods exist in the default VM, and your implementations are perfectly valid. Alternatively, you can use Jakarta StringUtils.

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for isnullorempty: return a == null || a.length == 0;
for isnullorwhitespace you have to check every single character until you find a non whitespace one (ascii or unicode)

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apache.commons.lang.StringUtils is the answer.

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