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On our online billing application, we give a billing summary of what bills the customer received and the payments they made.

In order for this to work, I have to first pull the payments then match them to the bills. So I have do something like:

foreach (BillPaymentSummary payment in billPayments)
{
    DateTime dt = payment.DueDate;

    // Debug errors on this next line
    var summary = (from a in db.BillHistories
                   where a.CustomerId == customerNumber && a.DueDate == dt && a.Type == "BILL"
                   select new BillSummary
                   {
                       Id = a.Id,
                       CustomerId = a.CustomerId,
                       DueDate = a.DueDate,
                       PreviousBalance = a.PreviousBalance.Value,
                       TotalBill = a.TotalBill.Value,
                       Type = a.Type,
                       IsFinalBill = a.IsFinalBill
                   }).SingleOrDefault();

    if (summary != null)
    {
        summary.PayDate = payment.PaidDate;
        summary.AmountPaid = payment.AmountPaid;
        returnSummaries.Add(summary);
    }
    else
    {
        summary = (from a in db.BillHistories
                   where a.CustomerId == customerNumber && a.DueDate == payment.DueDate && a.Type == "ADJ "
                   select new BillSummary
                   {
                       Id = a.Id,
                       CustomerId = a.CustomerId,
                       DueDate = a.DueDate,
                       PreviousBalance = a.PreviousBalance.Value,
                       TotalBill = a.TotalBill.Value,
                       Type = a.Type,
                       IsFinalBill = a.IsFinalBill
                   }).SingleOrDefault();

        if (summary != null)
        {
            summary.PayDate = payment.PaidDate;
            summary.AmountPaid = payment.AmountPaid;
            returnSummaries.Add(summary);
        }
    }
}

I have been playing with this, but no matter what I do, I get the following error message:

The entity or complex type 'UtilityBill.Domain.Concrete.BillSummary' cannot be constructed in a LINQ to Entities query.

Is it because I am running queries within queries? How can I get around this error?

I have tried searching Google for an answer and see many answers, but none of them seem to explain my problem.

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of The entity cannot be constructed in a LINQ to Entities query –  flipchart Aug 22 '13 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You cannot project onto a mapped entity. You would have to call ToList() before doing your mapping.

Or better yet, change to the following (calling FirstOrDefault will execute the query and allow you to populate your object):

var summary = db.BillHistories.FirstOrDefault(a => a.CustomerId == customerNumber && a.DueDate == dt && a.Type == "BILL").Select(x => new BillSummary
                               {
                                   Id = a.Id,
                                   CustomerId = a.CustomerId,
                                   DueDate = a.DueDate,
                                   PreviousBalance = a.PreviousBalance.Value,
                                   TotalBill = a.TotalBill.Value,
                                   Type = a.Type,
                                   IsFinalBill = a.IsFinalBill
                               });

To decouple yourself from the Entity Framework you may want to also consider using a different model class to return instead of the Entity Framework model.

share|improve this answer
    
This got me on the right direction though not fully the right answer. I want to give you credit thought. –  Mike Wills Dec 12 '11 at 19:28
    
@MikeWills thanks for the rep! I think I did point out what was wrong with your code and how to fix it though. –  Craig Dec 12 '11 at 20:13
1  
@MikeWills i deleted my edit which indicated that calling Where and then FirstOrDefault would cause extra SQL to be generated as that does not appear to be the case. Maybe this was a problem in an earlier version because I have been following this rule for quite some time...or maybe it was just misinformation. –  Craig Dec 12 '11 at 21:02

What I ended up doing was:

        foreach (BillPaymentSummary payment in billPayments)
        {
            var data = db.BillHistories.Where(b => b.CustomerId == customerNumber && b.DueDate == payment.DueDate && b.Type == "B").FirstOrDefault();

            if (data != null) // There is a bill history
            {
                returnSummaries.Add(new BillSummary
                {
                    Id = data.Id,
                    CustomerId = data.CustomerId,
                    DueDate = data.DueDate,
                    PreviousBalance = data.PreviousBalance,
                    TotalBill = data.TotalBill,
                    Type = (data.Type.Trim() == "B" ? "BILL" : (data.Type == "A" ? "ADJ" : "")),
                    IsFinalBill = data.IsFinalBill,
                    PayDate = payment.PaidDate,
                    AmountPaid = payment.AmountPaid
                });
            }
            else // No bill history record, look for an adjustment
            {
                data = db.BillHistories.FirstOrDefault(b => b.CustomerId == customerNumber && b.DueDate == payment.DueDate && b.Type == "A");

                if (data != null)
                {
                    returnSummaries.Add(new BillSummary
                    {
                        Id = data.Id,
                        CustomerId = data.CustomerId,
                        DueDate = data.DueDate,
                        PreviousBalance = data.PreviousBalance,
                        TotalBill = data.TotalBill,
                        Type = (data.Type.Trim() == "B" ? "BILL" : (data.Type == "A" ? "ADJ" : "")),
                        IsFinalBill = data.IsFinalBill,
                        PayDate = payment.PaidDate,
                        AmountPaid = payment.AmountPaid
                    });
                }
            }
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I think that is a terrible solution. Mapping anonymous types manually to defined entity classes. Not judging you though... I too feel like left in the rain by Microsoft... I you want to use an ORM, you want it to fill the gap between relational data and entity classes. This is not what is happening here. –  ckonig Jun 12 '12 at 7:53

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