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I've been programming for years, but I can never quite decide the correct place to comment on the function of a for loop. Before, to the right, or after?

// iterate over rows, blah blah...
for (std::string row : csv) {
    ...
}
for (std::string row : csv) { // iterate over rows, blah blah...
    ...
}
for (std::string row : csv) {
    // iterate over rows, blah blah...
    ...
}

Commenting to the right saves a line, but is less readable and tends to make the line go over 80 characters. Commenting below kind of works, but that may be where I place the comment for the first block of code within the for loop. What's your preferred style and why?

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closed as not constructive by parapura rajkumar, Nim, Michael Dorgan, ereOn, C. A. McCann Dec 12 '11 at 15:44

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6  
very subjective - anyways, the code appears to be clear - why do you need a comment at all? –  Nim Dec 12 '11 at 15:35
1  
This is pure opinion. There is no one preferred style, unless you work for a company that has established style requirements that cover this scenario. As a fourty-something professional programmer my preference when working in existing code is "When in Rome, do as the Romans do". If it is new code, then I do whatever feels right to me then. –  Mordachai Dec 12 '11 at 15:37
    
@Nim: It is subjective, but commenting is part of coding - so there is a place for discussion. Actually, an organization should discuss these things. "Follow the standard", some say - yes, of course, but what if you are writing the standard right now? At some point a decision must be made. So the question is in place. –  Daniel Daranas Dec 12 '11 at 15:40
    
@DanielDaranas, I'm not saying commenting isn't part of coding - but where to place the comment as a standard is being a little too pre-occupied with the wrong things! Anyway - my comment stems from the code, it's pretty clear the loop is iterating over the rows, why state that in a comment - it's a little redundant! –  Nim Dec 12 '11 at 15:46
    
I vote for no comments at all here. Comments should be used to explain stuff that is not obvious (usually the intention of the code not how the code does it (unless that is not obvious)). I think that the loop here is self explanatory; commenting that is just a code smell (see Refactoring by Martin Fowlers and Refactoring Workbook by William Wake ) –  Loki Astari Dec 12 '11 at 16:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The most widespread commenting style I've seen is commenting before doing, so I prefer the first option. It is simply more consistent with the commenting style in the rest of the code, i.e., it does not give a specific treatment to loops.

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1  
I agree, it gives the reader a heads up to what is happening here if s/he cares to read the comments. Same line is sometimes not enough space to explain what is happening. Also it is considered bad practice to write comments such as //loops through items in object for (int i=0; i<object.length; i++) because it doesn't actually explain anything... Better to write a comment such as: //Sorting the items for performance OR //Searching for item with a characteristic to be used later... –  c0d3Junk13 Dec 12 '11 at 15:37

The preferred way usually is to look at existing code and follow the same convention as everybody else.

If you have a new way with obvious advantages you can convince everyone else to use it.

That being said, Personally I am not found of your second method as on a small monitor the comments might get clipped by small screen resolution.

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The question is still in place for new projects, or (if the coding standard is common to all projects, as usual) for new organizations. –  Daniel Daranas Dec 12 '11 at 15:41

Comments such as // iterating over <some dataset> is quite unnecessary since a well formed loop statement clearly states what is about to be traversed.

I'd prefer to leave out the "loop comment" and add comments inside of the loop body to explain things that aren't trivial to understand. (even though the below loop body isn't that hard to figure out, it's just an example)

for (Object::const_iterator cit = obj.begin (); cit != obj.end (); ++cit) {
   /*
    * allocate memory for N items
    * each item has a size of 1 kB (1024*1024)
    * */

   T* pointer = new char[1024*1024 * cit->foobar];
 }

ie. I guess my vote is for a modified version of option number #3, though comments should be used sparely.

The world would be a much better place if people focused more on how to write code that's easy to comprehend, instead of talking so much about where to put the comments explaining the things they didn't refactor properly.

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I agree, and my example may have seemed trivial (I intended for "blah blah" to stand in for something more substantial). But there are scenarios when you'd comment on a loop to explain why it's doing what it's doing. –  daj Dec 12 '11 at 16:06

My preference is to place comments one line above the chunk of code in question, as in your first example. I do so because if I were scrolling through someone's code and spotted something that made me go "huh?", I'd want to know right away why they're performing a given action.

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Of course the 1st one.

The 2nd one makes a long line, long lines are bad.

The 3rd one will be mixed together with the comment inside the loop. (Actually a loop need that much comment need refactor I guess)

So the 1st one is the best.

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