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I am working on a project with the following conditions:

  • Visual Studio 2010
  • ASP.NET MVC 3
  • EF 4.1 (can use something else if recommended)
  • Code first

I am trying to model the following, but I stuck in my thinking on how to do it best.

I have these objects.

public class Facility
{
    public virtual int FacilityId;
    public virtual string Name;
    public virtual List<TaskCategory> TaskCategories;
}

public class TaskCategory
{
    public virtual int TaskCategoryId;
    public virtual string Name;
}

public class User
{
    public virtual int UserId;
    public virtual string Username;
}

Facility and TaskCategory is a many-to-many relationship Facility and User is a one-to-many relationship (one facility can have many users, one user can belong only to one facility)

Now I need some way to connect these three objects so that the following conditions are met: - In the system, one should be able to connect a user to a certain facility AND certain TaskCategory

In a traditional database I would model it like this:

User_id, Facility_id, TaskCategory_id
1,       1,           1
1,       1,           2
2,       1,           1
1,       2,           1

Which means that user 1 will have access to TaskCategories 1 and 2 in Facility 1 and TaskCateogry 1 in Facility 2. User 2 will have access to TaskCategory 1 in Facility 1.

Does this make sense, and how would I do this in an object-oriented environment that works with EF 4.1 (or other ORM).

UPDATE: The following code is what I ended up using (some irrelevant pieces not included here):

public class Facility
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    private ICollection<FacilityMembership> _facilityMembership;
    public virtual ICollection<FacilityMembership> FacilityMembership
    {
        get { return_facilityManager ?? (_facilityManager = new HashSet<FacilityMembership>(); }
        set { _facilityManager = value; }
    }
}

}

public class TaskCategory
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    private ICollection<FacilityMembership> _taskMemberships;
    public virtual ICollection<FacilityMembership> TaskMemberships
    {
        get { return _taskMemberships?? (_taskMemberships= new HashSet<FacilityMembership>()); }
        set { _taskMemberships = value; }
    }
}

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Username { get; set; }

    private ICollection<FacilityMembership> _facilityMembership;
    public virtual ICollection<FacilityMembership> FacilityMembership
    {
        get { return_facilityManager ?? (_facilityManager = new HashSet<FacilityMembership>(); }
        set { _facilityManager = value; }
    }
}

public class FacilityMembership
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int FacilityId { get; set; }
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    private ICollection<TaskCategory> _taskCategories;
    public virtual ICollection<TaskCategory> TaskCategories
    {
        get { return _taskCategories ?? (_taskCategories = new HashSet<TaskCategories>()); }
        set { _taskCategories = value; }
    }
}

And then mapping via fluent api:

        modelBuilder.Entity<FacilityMembership>().HasKey(fm => fm.Id);
        modelBuilder.Entity<FacilityMembership>()
                    .HasMany(fm => fm.TaskCategories)
                    .WithMany(tc => tc.FacilityMemberships)
                    .Map(m =>
                             {
                                 m.MapLeftKey("FacilityMembershipId");
                                 m.MapRightKey("TaskCategoryId");
                             });
share|improve this question
    
you need to establish a relationship between Facility and User..i think that is missing .. – ashutosh raina Dec 12 '11 at 16:07
    
It is established, maybe I simplified to much in my example above. The classes have more properties. In reality User have the property "public virtual List<Facility> Facilities" – Sverker84 Dec 12 '11 at 16:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your traditional database model suggests it is a many-to-many relationship (user to facility) with additional properties (tasks). There is no magic way to do this in EF, it's simply the same as you would in a database, with an extra table/entity.

public class User {
  ICollection<FacilityTask> FacilityTask {get; set;}
}

public class FacilityTask {
  public Facility Facility {get; set;}
  public Task Task {get; set;}
}

or 

public class FacilityTasks {
  public Facility Facility {get; set;}
  public ICollection<Task> Task {get; set;}
}

There may be a better naming scheme than FacilityTasks, perhaps a FacilityMembership? A user belongs to a Facility and there are tasks associated to that membership.

share|improve this answer
    
I used an extra entity called FacilityTaskCategoryUser (Facility, TaskCategory, User). Should I add the way I solved it to my original question in some way now? I don't think it's the best practice solution that I cam up with thanks to your answer, but it works for now. – Sverker84 Dec 13 '11 at 10:16
    
It couldn't hurt to edit your question and put your solution in there, you may help someone else or get a suggestion on how to make it better from someone. – Betty Dec 13 '11 at 20:08

Question: Facilities have Tasks and the user can have Facilities and Tasks that are not related each other? If so, which name will you put to that table you suggested? You can create a class with that "name".

If not, your user can just have a collection of Tasks and you can access the Facilities doing

return Tasks.Select(x => x.Facility).Distinct();

Another option is to have both collections in your User class.

share|improve this answer
    
Facilities have Tasks, but the user does not have Tasks directly, only through the Facilities they "belong" to. Maybe I am thinking about the relationships the wrong way? The heart of the system is the Facilities, and to them, Tasks are generated. The TaskCategories assigned to a Facility is so that the proper Tasks are generated in a scheduled run. A Facility can have many "janitors" who each are only allowed to mark tasks of a certain TaskCategory as completed for that Facility. Then they can have rights to other TaskCategories on another Facility. – Sverker84 Dec 12 '11 at 16:30
    
So, it seems you can have just a collection of Facilities in your User class and a collection of Tasks in your Facility class. From the db model perspective, your table Task will have a foreign key to Facilities, and Facilities will have a Foreign key to User. If the relationship between Users and Facilities is Many-to-many, then you'll need the "intermediate" table. – ivowiblo Dec 14 '11 at 5:42

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