Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working with an unmanaged resource with C#. The resource exposes a callback that can be setup for certain events that could happen within the hardware. To gain access to the unmanaged functions I do the following:

[DllImportAttribute("testDLL.dll", EntryPoint = "InstallCallback")]
public static extern short InstallCallback(uint handle, byte x, byte y, IntFuncPtr ptr);

[UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.StdCall)]
public delegate void IntFuncPtr(uint handle, byte x, byte y, LogEntry info);

I first install the callback with a reference to a method that follows the IntFuncPtr delegate. I then let the hardware go do its thing. After roughly 4700 calls of the callback the application crashes. The callback works fine if I write the code in c/c++ however I can replicate it by removing the __stdcall from my callback function. From C# I cannot catch the error which indicates the application is dying in the unmanaged resource. With the c/c++ application I can see that the stack overflows without __stdcall.

I thought that the delegate might not work with the calling convention stdcall so I tried the following:

[DllImportAttribute("testDLL.dll", EntryPoint = "InstallCallback")]
public static extern short InstallCallback(uint handle, byte x, byte y, IntPtr ptr);

public delegate void IntFuncPtr(uint handle, byte x, byte y, LogEntry info);

var callBackDelegate = new IntFuncPtr(Callback);
var callBackPtr = Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(callBackDelegate);
InstallCallback(handle, 1, 1, callBackPtr);

This also did not work.

To summarize, I have an unmanaged callback that requires a function pointer to a function defined as a __stdcall. If the function pointer is to a non __stdcall function then the stack grows and overflows. I am attempting to use the callback in C# using DllImport and an UnmanagedFunctionPointer delegate with stdcall calling convention. When I do this the C# application acts like a c/c++ application that uses a non __stdcall function.

How can I get this to work entirely in C#?

Edit 1:

Here is the native method definition & structure information including the C# structure information.

extern "C" __declspec( dllexport ) short __stdcall InstallCallback(unsigned int handle, unsigned char x, unsigned char y, LOG_ENTRY info );

typedef union
{
    unsigned int ul_All;
    struct
    {
    unsigned int ul_Info:24;
    unsigned int uc_IntType:8;
    }t;

    struct
    {
    unsigned int ul_Info:24;

    unsigned int uc_Biu1:1;
    unsigned int uc_Biu2:1;
    unsigned int uc_Dma:1;
    unsigned int uc_Target:1;
    unsigned int uc_Cmd:1;
    unsigned int uc_Biu3:1;
    unsigned int uc_Biu4:1;
    unsigned int res:1;
    }b;
} LOG_ENTRY_C;

typedef union
{
    unsigned int All;
    struct
    {
    AiUInt32 Index:16;
    AiUInt32 Res:8;
    AiUInt32 IntSrc:8;
    }t;
} LOG_ENTRY_D;

typedef struct log_entry
{
    unsigned int a;
    unsigned int b;
    LOG_ENTRY_C c;
    LOG_ENTRY_D d;
} LOG_ENTRY;

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct LogEntry {
    public uint Lla;
    public uint Llb;
    public LogEntryC Llc;
    public LogEntryD Lld;
}

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct LogEntryC {
    [FieldOffsetAttribute(0)]
    public uint All;
    [FieldOffsetAttribute(0)]
    public LogEntryCT t;
    [FieldOffsetAttribute(0)]
    public LogEntryCB b;
}

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct LogEntryD {
    [FieldOffsetAttribute(0)]
    public uint All;
    [FieldOffsetAttribute(0)]
    public LogEntryDT t;
}

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct LogEntryCT {
    public uint bitvector1;
    public uint IntType {
        get { return ((uint)((this.bitvector1 & 255u))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)((value | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Info {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 4294967040u) / 256))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 256) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
}
[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct LogEntryCB {
    public uint bitvector1;
    public uint res {
        get { return ((uint)((this.bitvector1 & 1u))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)((value | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Biu4 {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 2u) / 2))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 2) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Biu3 {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 4u) / 4))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 4) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Cmd {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 8u) / 8))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 8) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Target {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 16u) / 16))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 16) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Dma {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 32u) / 32))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 32) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Biu2 {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 64u) / 64))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 64) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Biu1 {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 128u) / 128))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 128) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Info {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 4294967040u) / 256))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 256) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
}

[StructLayoutAttribute(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct LogEntryDT {
    public uint bitvector1;
    public uint IntSrc {
        get { return ((uint)((this.bitvector1 & 255u))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)((value | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Res {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 65280u) / 256))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 256) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
    public uint Index {
        get { return ((uint)(((this.bitvector1 & 4294901760u) / 65536))); }
        set { this.bitvector1 = ((uint)(((value * 65536) | this.bitvector1))); }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you checked that your delegate has not been garbage collected, causing your unmanaged code to call a function that no longer exists? –  tinman Dec 12 '11 at 16:27
    
I am verifying this now. The callback works for around ~4700 calls and it is consistently around that number. I believe if it was a GC issue it wouldn't be so consistent. I will give an update once I have run a few more tests. –  Lux782 Dec 12 '11 at 16:33
add comment

2 Answers

Seems to be a memory leak problem. Do you know if you need to free any memory related to the received objects (like the LogEntry)?

I have a similar scenario where I need to free the memory of every object passed to my callback method.

Review your C# code and try to identify what you are doing different from the c/c++ one.

share|improve this answer
    
I posted as an answer because I can't comment yet. If I get 5 votes in this answer I will be able to comment :-) –  Carlos Bomtempo Dec 12 '11 at 17:02
    
No cleanup is required for the LogEntry structure. –  Lux782 Dec 12 '11 at 17:19
add comment

Did you try to specify explicitly calling convention

[DllImportAttribute("testDLL.dll", EntryPoint = "InstallCallback", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall) ]
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this as well. –  Lux782 Dec 12 '11 at 17:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.