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Can someone explain why the below code throws the following exception:

InvalidCastException: Unable to cast object of type 'System.Collections.ObjectModel.Collection'1[UserQuery+Test]' to type 'System.Collections.ObjectModel.Collection'1[UserQuery+ITest]'.

public interface ITest
{
}

public class Test : ITest
{
}

void Main()
{
  Collection<Test> t = new Collection<Test>();
  t.Add(new UserQuery.Test());
  var casted = (Collection<ITest>)t.Cast<ITest>();
}

The signature for Cast<T> implies T is output, but it isn't. What is going on? Does covariance have anything to do with it?

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When you use Enumerable.Cast<T>, you're creating a new IEnumerable<T>, not just "casting" in the traditional sense of a cast.

As such, the collection returned is no longer a Collection<T>, but rather an internal (non-public) implementation of IEnumerable<ITest>.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, it may or may not create a new IEnumerable<T>. It's optimized not to if it doesn't have to. See msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2011/01/13/… – Jon Skeet Dec 12 '11 at 18:21
    
@JonSkeet Very true - but its safer to assume that it's not going to be the same collection type you're passing in... – Reed Copsey Dec 12 '11 at 18:22
1  
It's safer to assume either could happen - operations on the result could affect the source or not, so either way has dangers to bad assumptions. – Jon Hanna Dec 12 '11 at 18:26
    
@JonHanna How does assuming that you have to treat it as IEnumerable<T> lead to bad assumptions? If you assume its IEnumerable<T>, you're going to be using it as read-only/enumerate-only, which should always be the safer assumption here... (There is no way, given that interface, to operate on the collection.) – Reed Copsey Dec 12 '11 at 18:28
    
@Reed I wouldn't assume anything. Assuming it is a different collection will bite you if you think you can enumerate over it and change the collection, because if it is the same collection, you'll get an exception when attempting that. – Fernando Dec 12 '11 at 18:29

Casting is unnecessary. You can create a Collection so you don't need to cast:

void Main()
{
  Collection<ITest> t = new Collection<ITest>();
  t.Add(new UserQuery.Test());
}
share|improve this answer

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