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Why does the following code compile:

int main()
{
   int j = 1;
   int *jp = &j;

   cout << "j is " << j << endl;
   cout << "jp is " << jp << endl;
   cout << "*jp is " << *jp << endl;
   cout << "&j is " << &j << endl;
   cout << "&jp is " << &jp << endl;
}

but not this?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
   int j = 1;
   int *jp;
   *jp =& j; // This is the only change I have made.
   cout << "j is " << j << endl;
   cout << "jp is " << jp << endl;
   cout << "*jp is " << *jp << endl;
   cout << "&j is " << &j << endl;
   cout << "&jp is " << &jp << endl;
}

This compiles when I do jp = &j, why? I have only initialized jp in another line, this is not making sense to me.

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What error are you getting when you compile? –  Andrew Marshall Dec 12 '11 at 18:26
    
prog.cpp:9: error: invalid conversion from ‘int*’ to ‘int’ result: compilation error –  user1084113 Dec 12 '11 at 18:28
    
Thanks for the quick replies guys, ur answers really helped. –  user1084113 Dec 12 '11 at 18:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted
int *jp;

jp is a pointer. Its value (jp) is a memory address. It points to (*jp) an integer. When you do

jp = &j;

This sets the value to the memory address of j. So now *jp will point to j. When you do

*jp = &j;

This sets the value of the thing jp is pointing to to the memory address of j. When you do:

int *jp;
*jp = &j;

jp is not pointing to anything yet - its value is uninitialized. *jp = &j tries to follow the memory address of the value of jp, which is something random, and set it to &j... which will probably cause a segfault.


To clarify: The * in (int *jp;) is a different one than in *jp = .... The former just declares jp as a pointer. The latter defines how you do the assignment. To make it even more explicit, doing:

int *jp = &j;

is the same as

int *jp; jp = &j;

Note there is no * on the assignment.

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*jp = &j;

This right here. Take note of the *. This goes and gets the data pointed to by the pointer, similar to what -> does for objects. What you're doing here is assigning a memory address to an int. The pointer jp points to an int called *jp.

In short, jp is a pointer to an int (therefore an address) and *jp is the int that jp points to. Using &j is getting you the address of j, or a pointer to it.

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Change this:

*jp =& j; //this is the only change I have made, 

Into this:

jp =& j; 

That will make it compile.

The reason int *jp = &j; compiles is because it is declaring and initializing a value. In the non-compiling code, you are doing an assignment. And trying to assign an integer expression (*jp) to a pointer one (&j). Which doesn't make sense at all.

If you do:

jp = &j;

Then it will compile because you are assigning a pointer expression (&j) into a pointer variable (jp). There is type concordance in this case, so it makes sense it is compiling.

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Yes I have noticed that but why is it? –  user1084113 Dec 12 '11 at 18:28
    
@user1084113: I tried to elaborate a little bit more and updated the answer. –  Pablo Santa Cruz Dec 12 '11 at 18:30

*jp =& j; says "write the value of &j to the location that jp points to". This is wrong a) because jp doesn't point to anything and b) because &j is a pointer and the value that jp points to should be an int, not a pointer.

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int *jp = &j; declares jp to be an int* (pointer to int), and initialises it with &j (the address of j).

*jp = &j dereferences the pointer to j (giving a reference to j), and then attempts to assign &j to j. This is illegal because j is an int and &j is an int*.

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You're parsing it in your head wrong.

The statement:

int *jp = &j;

really ought to be read as:

int* jp = &j;

Resulting in the actins:

  • declare jp as a pointer to an integer
  • assign the value of &j to jp

which matches the correction of your second code block:

   int *jp;
   jp = &j; // This is the only change I have made.
share|improve this answer

You're getting tripped up by the difference between an initialization and an assignment; the two are different things.

The line

int *jp = &j;

declares jp as a pointer to int and initializes it with the result of the expression &j, which has type "pointer to int" (int *).

The line

*jp = &j;

attempts to assign the result of the expression &j (which has type int *, remember) to the result of the expression *jp (which has the type int1). Since the types of the two expressions don't match, you get a compile-time error.

Note that the fact that jp hasn't been initialized to point anywhere meaningful yet would be a runtime error, not a compile-time error; IOW, if you had written *jp = 5; instead, the program would have compiled just fine (the expressions *jp and 5 have compatible types), but would have (most likely) blown up when you tried to run it.


1 Declarations in C and C++ are based on the types of expressions, not objects. For example, we're declaring jp as a pointer to int. To retrieve the value of the integer being pointed to, we dereference the pointer with the * operator, as in the statement

x = *jp;  

The type of the expression *jp is int, so the declaration of the pointer is

int *jp;  
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