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As far as I know, private is the default everywhere in C# (meaning that if I don't write public, protected, internal, etc. it will be private by default). (Please correct me if I am wrong.)

So, what's the reason to write that keyword, or why does it even exist for members?

For example, when an event handler is auto-generated it looks like this:

private void RatTrap_MouseEnter(object sender, CheeseEventArgs e)
{

}

But why does it even write private if that's implied and default? Just so that novice developers (who don't know it's the C# default) know that it's private? Or is there a difference for the compiler?

Moreover, is there a case where writing "private" (alone) will change the accessibility of the member?

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IIRC, a "top-level" type will be internal by default however. –  Jeff Mercado Dec 12 '11 at 18:43
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The default for everything is not private, as indicated, and as a general rule of thumb it's better to be explicit. –  James Michael Hare Dec 12 '11 at 18:45
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Related: Does C# need the private keyword? –  BoltClock Jan 9 '12 at 13:30
    
The default for everything is "as private as possible." Obviously a non-nested class can't be private, or nothing could instantiate or use it. But members are private by default, and nested classes are private by default. Everything in C# has, by default, the most restricted level of visibility it can have. –  Kyralessa Jan 10 '12 at 21:24
    

10 Answers 10

up vote 141 down vote accepted

AFAIK, private is the default everywhere in C# (meaning that if I don't write public, protected, internal, etc. it will be private by default). (please correct me if wrong).

This is not true. Types defined within a namespace (classes, structs, interfaces, etc) will be internal by default. Also, members within different types have different default accessibilities (such as public for interface members). For details, see Accessibility Levels on MSDN.

Also,

So, what's the reason to write that keyword, or why does it even exist?

Specifying this explicitly helps denote your intention to make the type private, very explicitly. This helps with maintainability of your code over time. This can help with other developers (or yourself) knowing whether a member is private by default or on purpose, etc.

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+1 as I just posted the same regarding readability and intent. –  Maess Dec 12 '11 at 18:46
    
Marked as best answer because it had more votes from other users. Thanks to all for answering. –  Camilo Martin Dec 12 '11 at 19:04
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+1 just for having an answer with a higher score than Jon Skeet! –  Wayne Dec 13 '11 at 10:14
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@Wayne : he have an answer with higher score than Jon Skeet but he doesn't deserve it... The Jon answer is a lot more accurate . –  aleroot May 2 '12 at 5:39
    
This is a pointless distinction. Types within a namespace are internal by default because they can't be private by default; otherwise nothing could use them. They're still as restricted as they can possibly be, by default. –  Kyralessa May 17 '12 at 3:52

AFAIK, private is the default everywhere in C#

Not quite - the default is "the most restricted access available for this declaration". So for example, with a top-level type the default is internal; for a nested type the default is private.

So, what's the reason to write that keyword, or why does it even exist?

It makes it explicit, which is good for two reasons:

  • It makes it clearer for those who don't know the defaults, as per your question (I've never liked this argument, personally, but I figured it's worth mentioning)
  • It gives an impression that you've deliberately decided to make it private, rather than just gone with the defaults.

As for your last part:

Moreover is there a case where writing "private" (alone) will change the accessibility of the member?

Yes, for making half of a property more restrictive than the other:

// Public getter, public setter
public int Foo { get; set; }

// Public getter, private setter
public int Bar { get; private set; }

I used to go with defaults everywhere I could, but I've been convinced (partly by Eric Lippert) that making it clear that you've thought about it and decided to make something private is a good idea.

Personally I wish there were a way of doing that for sealed / unsealed, too, for type declarations - possibly not even have a default. I suspect that many developers (myself included if I'm not careful) leave classes unsealed just because it's less effort than making them sealed.

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Thank you for your insight. I remembered about the properties case after I posted the question. Now just wait a moment while I seal a couple of classes I've written today... :) –  Camilo Martin Dec 12 '11 at 18:53
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Wow, I had no idea you could make private setters. +1. –  minitech Dec 13 '11 at 4:35
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@minitech: The other way round works too, but is less useful. This was all introduced in C# 2. –  Jon Skeet Dec 13 '11 at 5:19
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I certainly wish there were no defaults at all and the compiler just threw an error if the access modifier was missing. I don't think most people know what the defaults are for every situation, which then leads to unintended errors. –  Phong Dec 13 '11 at 19:44
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@Phong, for C# there's one easy rule: By default, everything is as private as it can be. Items in a namespace such as non-nested classes can't be private, because nothing could use them. They can only be internal or public; so by default, they're internal. Things inside of other things (enums within a class; nested classes; properties; fields; methods...) are private by default. –  Kyralessa May 21 '12 at 17:26

As far as I know, private is the default everywhere in C#

Explicitly declaring private, means you know it is private. Not just think it is, because as far as you know, it is the default. It also means that someone else who looks at the code knows what it is.

There is no "I think it is", "I'm pretty sure it is", etc. It just is. And everyone is on the same page.

I am not a C# developer. If I had to work with some code that wasn't explicitly declared private, I would probably assume it was internal.

I dislike when things are implicitly set. It's never as clear as when they are explicitly set.

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Sounds reasonable, I even forget basics of languages I once knew better. –  Camilo Martin Dec 12 '11 at 21:47

Readability, demonstration of intent are two great reasons I can think of.

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Agreed. E.g. if you're working with other developers on a bit of code, setting something to private helps to indicate your intent. It's also helpful when you jump back into your code after a number of years and your IDE can tell you what methods should be publicly accessible for that class. –  Aaron Newton Dec 13 '11 at 22:53

Readability - Not everyone may know that private is the default behaviour.

Intent - Gives a clear indication that you have specifically declared the property private (for whatever reason).

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private adds visual clutter. To those who insist that it makes things explicit, I would ask: Do you do this with mathematics, too? For instance:

var answer = a + b / c;

Do you find that unclear without redundant parentheses around b / c?

The rule in C# is very simple: By default, everything is as close to private as it can be. So if you need something to be more visible than the default, add a modifier. Otherwise, don't add needless keywords to your code.

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I used to agree with this right before asking the question. But, some people write VB, some C++, some even F# (coming from other functional languages such as Haskell perhaps?), better than they do on C#. So, for them (and for us if we forget about it after 2 years of no c#ing) it's better if accessors are explicit. Don't undervalue the impact easy learning has on a project, many developers come from backgrounds which may not reflect the tool of choice, and they do need learning aids, even in production code, this is not bad at all (and we know many code very bad C#, so a few aids help us too). –  Camilo Martin Jan 11 '12 at 2:20
    
In addition, math is something we learn for more than a decade on schools. C# can't be compared to that (I'd agree if we were talking about removing meaningless parentheses in mathematical expressions). –  Camilo Martin Jan 11 '12 at 2:20
    
Well, sure, in VB the defaults are atrocious. I think the default visibility is Friend for members, for instance. C# does its visibility defaults the right way: Things are set to least visibility possible unless they're changed. From what I'm able to find, it appears the same is true for C++ (except structs). (It doesn't appear to be true for F#.) –  Kyralessa Jan 11 '12 at 4:22
    
In any case, a C# programmer writing VB could think "the .NET defaults seem to be alright!" and forget about the... uhm, differences the two languages have. And if you think the VB defaults are bad, look at javascript... closures being the only way out of the global scope. So being able to be clear about intentions is better in a world so full of differences. –  Camilo Martin Jan 11 '12 at 6:23
    
It's strange to me that so many people are in favor of var, because it cuts down on visual clutter, and yet so many people are in favor of pointlessly typing private. –  Kyralessa Jan 11 '12 at 16:36

One good reason for explicitly specifying the visibility is so that you don't have to think about what is the default for the context you are in.

Another good reason is because FxCop tells you to do it.

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+1, I just noticed about FxCop complaining about me removing the private modifier now when I built with the change. –  Camilo Martin Dec 12 '11 at 18:58

A lot of people (people like me!) regularly program in a handful of different languages. Being explicit with things like these prevents me from needing to remember all the arcane details of all the languages I program in.

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Well I wouldn't say "default access modifier is private" is an arcane detail... But I understand the point. The other day I had trouble remembering how the framework I used last week (MEF) worked. –  Camilo Martin Dec 31 '11 at 2:28

I'd say for consistency with the readability of the scope of the rest of the class.

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You're thinking of C++. In C#, even in structs, members default to private. –  hvd Dec 12 '11 at 18:46
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Structs do not have public accessibility by default - see: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ba0a1yw2.aspx –  Reed Copsey Dec 12 '11 at 18:46
    
Ah thank you, I am thinking C++. –  MGZero Dec 12 '11 at 18:58

Encapsulation—a cornerstone of OOP.

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You seem to miss the point of the question. Almost every where the private keyword is used, that is the default behavior if an accessibility modifier would be omitted entirely. The OP is wondering if the keyword will ever actually change the way a program functions, or if its existence is entirely a means of improving readability by specifying private instead of relying on the default value. (FYI, the answer is "no".) –  Servy May 6 '13 at 16:57

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