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I am working on a project that requires implementing am unmanaged windows DLL. The DLL is used to communicate with a USB device. My code is in C# and WPF. To initialize the DLL I call a function called:

InitTimerDll(Int32 wHandle, ref dllInitParams initParams);

When calling this function I have to pass a struct called dllInitParams and the Handle that the control is bound to. I am using DllImport for function pointer as such:

[DllImport("myDll.dll")]
public static extern void InitTimerDll(Int32 wHandle, ref dllInitParams initParams);

Here is my struct:

public struct dllInitParams
{
    public UInt16 simp;

    public UInt16 simt;
}

All of the above are in a separate class called myDllInterface.cs. Here is how I call the InitTimerDll function from my WPF form:

public IntPtr Handle
{
    get { return (new System.Windows.Interop.WindowInteropHelper(this)).Handle; }
}

private void initTime_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{   
    myDllInterface.dllInitParams initParams = new myDllInterface.dllInitParams();
    initParams.simp = 0;
    myDllInterface.InitTimerDll(this.Handle.ToInt32(), ref initParams);
}

The first part of the above code explains how I get the handle and the initTime_Click shows how I initialize the struct, call the initTimeDll function by passing the handle and the struct to it. I have copied the dll file in the directory that the code runs in. My code compiles just fine but it creates an error when I click on the initTime button. Error:

An unhandled exception of type 'System.AccessViolationException' occurred in ProbeCTRL.exe

Additional information: Attempted to read or write protected memory. This is often an indication that other memory is corrupt.

Why is this happening?

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1  
Hard to tell, the code that crashes isn't the code that you posted. You'll need to debug the native code. Project + Properties, Debug tab, tick "Enable unmanaged code debugging". Set a breakpoint on the InitTimerDll function in your C or C++ source code. –  Hans Passant Dec 12 '11 at 18:56
1  
Using an Int32 instead of IntPtr for handle values is probably going to cause problems in a 64-bit operating system. It's also possible your calling convention is wrong (The default in .NET is StdCall). –  vcsjones Dec 12 '11 at 18:58

3 Answers 3

Without knowing exactly what the InitTimerDll() function does with the 'this' pointer, I would focus on the params structure. Try adding a structure layout markup like the following:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]
public struct dllInitParams
{
    public UInt16 simp;
    public UInt16 simt;
}

Also, double check that your structure is complete and accurate.

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Thanks for your comments. I added a layoutKind to my struct as you mention above and I initialize all members of the struct. I also change tried to pass the Handle as int64 and IntPtr. In all cases same error occurred. DO you think the problem could be due to the struct or the handle? Unfortunately I don't know what does the Dll do when initTimerDll function is called but I know this is what initializes the communication with the device and allows calling other methods and sending data back and forth. Any other suggestion would be greatly appreciated. –  user1094315 Dec 12 '11 at 19:50
    
I wouldn't expand the Handle to Int64, unless that's what the DLL API actually requires. The previous comment regarding mixed-mode 32/64-bit problems won't occur, because you won't be able to load a 32-bit DLL into a 64-bit process. I would also make sure that you are calling this function on the same thread that owns the control, because cross-thread calls to UI elements can throw exceptions. Are you sure you have the DllImport correct? Is the second parameter an in/out parameter? Try removing the 'ref' from that parameter. –  Jim Gomes Dec 12 '11 at 20:26
    
I removed the "ref" and sent the struct rather than a pointer but I encounter the same error. I'm not doing any multithreading. So I'm assuming the function is running on the same thread. Is tehre any way to verify this in Visual studio 2008? –  user1094315 Dec 12 '11 at 21:22
    
Can you post the original C/C++ function declaration for the InitTimerDll() function, and any additional information on what it does with the parameters that are passed in? Does it re-allocate the init params structure? Should that structure be allocated on the unmanaged heap, or should it be passed in via a fixed() unsafe pin method? These are the questions I would hope to answer. –  Jim Gomes Dec 13 '11 at 18:55

I found the problem. The code is fine the problem was the dll file, which was corrupted. A proper copy of the dll file took care of the problem. When using dll in your codes it is quite important to make sure you have accurate information, function calls, data types to passed and so on. Thanks everyone for your help.

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Have a look at the PInvoke tutorial: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288468%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

as Jim Gomes points out:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]

or something similar is definitely important.

Also, you're only initializing one of the variables in your struct.

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