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I am using Celery with Django to manage a task que and using one (or more) small(single core) EC2 instances to process the task.

I have some considerations.

  • My task eats 100% CPU on a single core. - uses whatever CPU available but only in one core
  • If 2 tasks are in progress on the same core, each task will be slowed down by half.
  • I would like to start each task ASAP and not let it be que.

Now say I have 4 EC2 instances, i start celery with "-c 5" . i.e. 5 concurrent tasks per instance.

In this setup, if I have 4 new tasks, id like to ensure, each of them goes to different instance, rather than 4 going to same instance and each task fighting for CPU.

Similarly, if I have 8 tasks, id like each instance to get 2 tasks at a time, rather than 2 instances processing 4 tasks each.

Does celery already behave the way I described? If not then how can i make it behave as such?

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1 Answer 1

it's actually easy: you start one celery-instance per ec2-instance. set concurrency to the number of cores per ec2-instance.

now the tasks don't interfere and distribute nicely among you instances.

(the above assumes that your tasks are cpu bound)

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addendum: you don't gain anything if a task starts immediatly, but then has to compete for resources and is slows down everything. –  tback Dec 12 '11 at 19:58
    
but what if i have 4 x 2-core instances? and i use a concurrency of 2 for each worker... even then, id like to distribute 4 tasks across 4 separate instances to get better i/o –  sajal Dec 14 '11 at 19:48
    
Celery doesn't solve that problem. So set it to 1 if it's IO-Bound, set it to 2 if its CPU bound. In your question you say a single task uses 100% CPU. Does it use more than 50% IO? –  tback Dec 14 '11 at 21:05
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