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I'm writing a software for an embedded system that will do many input readings (including frequency) in a very short time, and thus the main loop needs to be as fast as possible.

I'm having trouble deciding how to implement the following code, though. Which version of the code would run faster? Would the compiler optimize the code automatically? Is an AND operation slower than an assignment?

First Code:

   if ((a&b) == (b&c))
   {
     if (a&b)
       //something;
     else
       //something else;
   }

Second code:

 int p;
 if ((p = (a&b)) == (b&c))
   {
     if (p)
       //something;
     else
       //something else;
   }
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closed as not constructive by James McNellis, Joe, user7116, derobert, C. A. McCann Dec 13 '11 at 17:52

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8  
Try both approaches, time them, and see which one is faster, or whether there is any difference at all. –  James McNellis Dec 12 '11 at 19:07
1  
+1 to James, and also, if you're interested, use objdump (or something similar) to look at the assembly instructions generated by each. –  Dan Fego Dec 12 '11 at 19:08
    
AND, in theory, is much faster than the assignment. But it is a good idea to time them. –  jsn Dec 12 '11 at 19:10
1  
I would expect both of them to produce the same code at any optimization level >0, unless a, etc... are actually complex expressions that dereference pointers or call functions. –  ninjalj Dec 12 '11 at 19:33
2  
Are a, b, and c all variables or are some of them compile time constants? Doing operations on compile time constants is more efficient (when possible). –  TJD Dec 12 '11 at 19:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In general there should be little difference, it depends on what you are doing with the variable p. In my examples below, p is never used and as a result SHOULD be optimized out, BUT gcc does something very interesting with this.

unsigned int fun1 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int c )
{

   if ((a&b) == (b&c))
   {
     if (a&b)
        return(1);
     else
        return(2);
   }

}

unsigned int fun2 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int c )
{

 int p;
 if ((p = (a&b)) == (b&c))
   {
     if (a&b)
        return(1);
     else
        return(2);
   }

}

First off there is an optimization based on your specific boolean algebra, choose different bitwise operators with this processor and you may not see a difference.

00000000 <fun1>:
   0:   e0222000    eor r2, r2, r0
   4:   e1120001    tst r2, r1
   8:   1a000003    bne 1c <fun1+0x1c>
   c:   e1110000    tst r1, r0
  10:   13a00001    movne   r0, #1
  14:   03a00002    moveq   r0, #2
  18:   e12fff1e    bx  lr
  1c:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000020 <fun2>:
  20:   e0010000    and r0, r1, r0
  24:   e0022001    and r2, r2, r1
  28:   e1500002    cmp r0, r2
  2c:   0a000000    beq 34 <fun2+0x14>
  30:   e12fff1e    bx  lr
  34:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
  38:   13a00001    movne   r0, #1
  3c:   03a00002    moveq   r0, #2
  40:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

So where you have the assignment for p it is prepping r0 to hold that value even though it is never used. Very strange that the compiler didnt catch that. Because I didnt specify a return value you get p back with the fun2 code above. If you add a return value at the end then the compiler simply tacks that on in both of the functions above. The compiler should have also complained that I didnt have a return value and didnt.

For fun1() it appears to be using a shortcut to decide on entering the top level if or not, then goes from there. Fun2 is generating the p variable then using it as the C code is written (comparing the ands). For this implementation of fun2() you are going to burn an extra instruction so it is slower. If it wasnt for the xor shortcut, with this processor, if it had done two ands the execution time would have been the same, the compiler could have simply decided to keep one of the registers as p for later or just discarded registers along the way. So if you use different bitwise operators you would expect the same code speed either way.

Using llvm instead of gcc, also note I added the return value at the bottom:

unsigned int fun1 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int c )
{

   if ((a&b) == (b&c))
   {
     if (a&b)
        return(1);
     else
        return(2);
   }
   return(3);

}

unsigned int fun2 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int c )
{

 int p;
 if ((p = (a&b)) == (b&c))
   {
     if (a&b)
        return(1);
     else
        return(2);
   }
 return(3);
}

before getting processor specific (note this is clang on the front end)

define i32 @fun1(i32 %a, i32 %b, i32 %c) nounwind readnone {
  %1 = xor i32 %c, %a
  %2 = and i32 %1, %b
  %3 = icmp eq i32 %2, 0
  br i1 %3, label %4, label %8

; <label>:4                                       ; preds = %0
  %5 = and i32 %b, %a
  %6 = icmp eq i32 %5, 0
  br i1 %6, label %7, label %8

; <label>:7                                       ; preds = %4
  br label %8

; <label>:8                                       ; preds = %7, %4, %0
  %9 = phi i32 [ 2, %7 ], [ 1, %4 ], [ 3, %0 ]
  ret i32 %9
}

define i32 @fun2(i32 %a, i32 %b, i32 %c) nounwind readnone {
  %1 = xor i32 %c, %a
  %2 = and i32 %1, %b
  %3 = icmp eq i32 %2, 0
  br i1 %3, label %4, label %8

; <label>:4                                       ; preds = %0
  %5 = and i32 %b, %a
  %6 = icmp eq i32 %5, 0
  br i1 %6, label %7, label %8

; <label>:7                                       ; preds = %4
  br label %8

; <label>:8                                       ; preds = %7, %4, %0
  %9 = phi i32 [ 2, %7 ], [ 1, %4 ], [ 3, %0 ]
  ret i32 %9
}

It has optimized out the p variable as it is not used...

00000000 <fun1>:
   0:   e1a03000    mov r3, r0
   4:   e3a00003    mov r0, #3
   8:   e0222003    eor r2, r2, r3
   c:   e1120001    tst r2, r1
  10:   11a0f00e    movne   pc, lr
  14:   e3a00001    mov r0, #1
  18:   e1110003    tst r1, r3
  1c:   03a00002    moveq   r0, #2
  20:   e1a0f00e    mov pc, lr

00000024 <fun2>:
  24:   e1a03000    mov r3, r0
  28:   e3a00003    mov r0, #3
  2c:   e0222003    eor r2, r2, r3
  30:   e1120001    tst r2, r1
  34:   11a0f00e    movne   pc, lr
  38:   e3a00001    mov r0, #1
  3c:   e1110003    tst r1, r3
  40:   03a00002    moveq   r0, #2
  44:   e1a0f00e    mov pc, lr

giving the same code for both functions. and they did the xor test instead of doing two ands.

I would typically expect an extra instruction to preserve the value in your second function, depending on the processor, optimization, what you do with that value. the impact could none to small relative to the rest of the code to implement the comparisons or when you add stack/memory accesses to preserve that value it could maybe cost you 50% or more time.

out of curiosity I tried this as well

unsigned int fun3 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int c )
{

 int p;
 p = a&b;
 if (p == (b&c))
   {
     if (p)
        return(1);
     else
        return(2);
   }
 return(3);
}

gcc:

0000004c <fun3>:
  4c:   e0010000    and r0, r1, r0
  50:   e0022001    and r2, r2, r1
  54:   e1500002    cmp r0, r2
  58:   0a000001    beq 64 <fun3+0x18>
  5c:   e3a00003    mov r0, #3
  60:   e12fff1e    bx  lr
  64:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
  68:   03a00002    moveq   r0, #2
  6c:   13a00001    movne   r0, #1
  70:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

llvm

00000048 <fun3>:
  48:   e0013000    and r3, r1, r0
  4c:   e0021001    and r1, r2, r1
  50:   e3a00003    mov r0, #3
  54:   e1530001    cmp r3, r1
  58:   11a0f00e    movne   pc, lr
  5c:   e3a00001    mov r0, #1
  60:   e3530000    cmp r3, #0
  64:   03a00002    moveq   r0, #2
  68:   e1a0f00e    mov pc, lr

gcc is burning a branch with its costs and llvm is taking the pipeline approach burning a number of extra instruction cycles but saving on the branch and pipe flush.

Are you starting to get the idea? Your question is very processor and compiler and compile option and system (cost of memory cycles vs instruction cycles, etc) specific. I expect the performance to be identical or 15% to 200% slower with a reasonable speed memory interface.

If you are worried about speed on these few lines of code...write them in assembler...

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Interesting (and unexpected to me!) result. +1 –  ninjalj Dec 12 '11 at 21:12

If efficiency is of concern, you may want to get rid of those if-statements completely. They may only impose a single machine instruction each, but if your branch predictor fails to make proper decisions, you'll end up with an empty instruction pipeline, resulting in considerable overhead.

There's a neat trick to replace if-statements with arithmetic expressions if your condition is boolean. Given the following piece of code:

if (a) {
    return 3;
} else {
    return 0;
}

Then you can get rid of the conditional jump with the following equivalent code:

return a*3;

If you aren't comforted with a return value of 0 in the else branch, you may still obtain a performance gain by rewriting if (a) { return x; } else { return y; } to...

return a*x + (!a)*y;

...and rely on your ALU to figure out how to most efficiently compute the result. Most ALUs can compute 0*x very efficiently.

Applying the technique described above to your piece of code, we obtain:

((a&b)==(b&c)) * ((a&b) * /*something*/ + (!(a&b)) * /*something else*/)

Since this has nothing to do with the One True Tao that the prophets of ISO/IEC had in mind, we have to take into account that 0*x and x*0 may lead to different results in terms of execution speed, so there's a bit of testing required here.


With this technique, I was able to gain a minor performance improvement on a particular Tuesday in 1995, but it may well turn out that your machine executes conditional jumps faster anyway. Good luck!

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Well, why don't we take a look at what the compiler actually does? Here's the output from those snippets of code generated by MSVC 2010 with the /Ox switch to perform optimizations:

  • the first sequence:

    ; 6    :     if ((a&b) == (b&c)) {
    
      00000 8b 44 24 08  mov     eax, DWORD PTR _b$[esp-4]
      00004 8b 4c 24 04  mov     ecx, DWORD PTR _a$[esp-4]
      00008 23 c8        and     ecx, eax
      0000a 23 44 24 0c  and     eax, DWORD PTR _c$[esp-4]
      0000e 3b c8        cmp     ecx, eax
      00010 75 0e        jne     SHORT $LN1@first
    
    ; 7    :         if (a&b)
    
      00012 85 c9        test    ecx, ecx
      00014 74 05        je  SHORT $LN2@first
    
    ; 8    :             dummy1();
    
      00016 e9 00 00 00 00   jmp     _dummy1
    $LN2@first:
    
    ; 9    :         else
    ; 10   :             dummy2();
    
      0001b e9 00 00 00 00   jmp     _dummy2
    
  • And the second sequence (using a temp variable):

    ; 6    :     int p;
    ; 7    :     
    ; 8    :     if ((p = (a&b)) == (b&c)) {
    
      00000 8b 4c 24 08  mov     ecx, DWORD PTR _b$[esp-4]
      00004 8b 44 24 04  mov     eax, DWORD PTR _a$[esp-4]
      00008 23 c1        and     eax, ecx
      0000a 23 4c 24 0c  and     ecx, DWORD PTR _c$[esp-4]
      0000e 3b c1        cmp     eax, ecx
      00010 75 0e        jne     SHORT $LN1@second
    
    ; 9    :         if (p)
    
      00012 85 c0        test    eax, eax
      00014 74 05        je  SHORT $LN2@second
    
    ; 10   :             dummy1();
    
      00016 e9 00 00 00 00   jmp     _dummy1
    $LN2@second:
    
    ; 11   :         else
    ; 12   :             dummy2();
    
      0001b e9 00 00 00 00   jmp     _dummy2
    

As I expected, they are nearly byte-for-byte identical (there's a slight difference in register usage). However, you might get a different result using a different compiler.

If this bit of code is that critical that you have to micro-optimize, you'll need to look at the generated code yourself. Keep in mind that the smallest change in the code or the compiler options used could cause enough difference in the generated code that you may need to keep a careful eye on it (or code it in assembly yourself).

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