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Ok, this might be really crazy, and/or stupid but..

I am writing an ircbot in Ruby to learn the language and I want to include a dispatcher for commands in the bot.

So let's say that I have a hash that defines which command that belongs to what function:

hash = { ".voice" => "basic", ".op" => "basic" }

And then I do this:

hash.each_pair do |k,v|
 case content[0]
  when k then v(content[1])
 end
end

Where content[0] is ".voice" and content[1] is the one being voiced.

This generates an error telling me that v is an undefined method for main:Object.

Is what I'm trying to do making any sense or is there a better way to do this? And if this way of doing this makes sense.. why does it return with that error?

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I don't think I understand what you are trying to do. The error you are getting is because v is a string. Are you trying to set v = content[1] ? –  Kassym Dorsel Dec 12 '11 at 19:37
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Suppose you have a method, and the method's name in a string:

def basic(v)
  puts v
end

method_name = 'basic'

If you do this:

method_name('Hello')

You'll get your error

undefined method `method_name' for main:Object (NoMethodError)

You have to make the string into a method object to be able to use it:

method_object = method(method_name)
method_object.call('Hello!')
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1  
Thank you! That was exactly what I was looking for, it works just fine now. :-) –  David Lind Dec 12 '11 at 19:38
    
Please express your thanks by voting up and accepting my answer –  maprihoda Dec 12 '11 at 19:43
    
Accepted.. I'm new here so it seems that I cannot upvote, sorry for that. –  David Lind Dec 12 '11 at 19:44
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Change...

 v(content[1])

to...

 send(v, content[1])
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