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Why can you not do the following?

class foo {
  private static foo instance  = new foo();
  List <string> messages = new List<string>();


  private foo(){}
  public static void doSomething(){..}

}

Edit:

I mean is there a difference between doing this:

class foo {
  private static foo instance  = new foo();
  List <string> messages = new List<string>();


  private foo(){}
  public static void doSomething(){..}

}

or

class foo {
  private static foo instance;
  List <string> messages = new List<string>();


  private foo(){}
  public static void doSomething(){..}

  public foo getInstance(){
    if(instance!=null){
       return instance;
    }
 }
}
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closed as not a real question by Ondrej Tucny, spender, casperOne Dec 13 '11 at 13:54

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What can't you do? Apart from a missing return type in doSomething all is fine here. –  spender Dec 12 '11 at 19:23
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is the non-lazy method of implementing the Singleton pattern for languages that support it. It's perfectly acceptable to do this, especially since it's one of the ways of implementing a thread-safe Singleton. However, if your Singleton object is expensive (see lazy initialization) to create, then it might not be appropriate to create it in this manner.

If your code doesn't compile, as the other answers point out, your syntax for the doSomething method is incorrect.

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Your method doSomething() is missing a return type. Try:

class Foo {
    private static Foo instance = new Foo();
    List<string> messages = new List<string>();

    private Foo() { }

    public static void doSomething() {
        // Make any necessary accesses to "instance" here.
    }
}
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You can, you just didn't give a return type to doSomething().

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