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If i iterate over a STL container i sometimes need to know if the current item is the last one in the sequence. Is there a better way, then doing something like this? Can i somehow convert rbegin()?

std::vector<int> myList;

// ....
std::vector<int>::iterator lastit = myList.end();  
lastit--;

for(std::vector<int>::iterator it = myList.begin(); it != myList.end(); it++)  {
     if(it == lastit)
     {
        // Do something with last element
     }
     else
     {
       //  Do something with all other elements
     }
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5  
If you want to do something special to the last element, just iterate over every element except for the last element and do something with the last element later. –  tstenner May 11 '09 at 13:06
1  
@tstenner: make an answer out of that - I'll most certainly vote you up! –  xtofl May 11 '09 at 13:59
    
@tstenner: Good answer. Keep in mind that your approach would need to require that myList is not empty. –  Drew Dormann May 11 '09 at 15:35
    
@tstenner: Your approach does not solve the problem, how to determine, which is the last element. –  RED SOFT ADAIR May 12 '09 at 7:56

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try the following

std::vector<int>::iterator it2 = (++it);
if ( it2 == myList.end() ) {
  ...
}

The following should work as well

if ( it+1 == myList.end() ) {
  // it is last
  ...
}
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Or: if (boost::next(it) == lastit) { ... –  Pukku May 11 '09 at 15:26

Maybe you can iterate backwards (use rbegin/rend) and put your special task before the loop or replace the end check with it != lastit and put the special handling after the loop

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I would have some doubts about my design if some elements need to be treated differntly, but this suggestion is a bit cleaner for me (don't forget to test for empty containers)

std::vector<int>::iterator lastit = myList.end();
if (lastit != myList.begin())
{
  lastit--;
  for(std::vector<int>::iterator it = myList.begin(); it != lastit; ++it)
  {
     // Do
  }
  // Do with last
}
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1  
I don't think this needs to be bad design. How about producing output like "a, b, c and d"? –  Uli Gerhardt May 11 '09 at 13:14

Use reversed iteration, this way you will have only one end()-1-like computation (notice the rbegin()+1) and no comparsions:

for(vector<int>::iterator it = myValues.rbegin()+1; it != myValues.rend(); it++) {
    cout << *it << endl;
}
cout << "Process last one: " << *myValues.rbegin() << endl;

Also, for the vector<>, computing end()-1 is probably fast, so you can also do it like following:

for(vector<int>::iterator it = myValues.begin(); it != myValues.end()-1; it++) {
    cout << *it << endl;
}
cout << "Process last one: " << *myValues.rbegin() << endl;

If you don't want to process the element after the loop, you can:

for(vector<int>::iterator it = myValues.rbegin(); it != myValues.rend(); it++) {
    if(it == myValues.rbegin())
        cout << "Process last one: " << *it << endl;
    else
        cout << *it << endl;
}
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Usually the order is important, so processing in reverse order isn't practical. –  Mark Ransom May 11 '09 at 15:06
    
I mostly find my self traversing collections in "for_each" like way, i.e. to do something with each element, without referring to other elements and order of processing. –  anon May 11 '09 at 16:13
    
True, for_each style processing wouldn't care about the order. But if you care about which one is the last, you probably care about the order of the others as well. –  Mark Ransom May 12 '09 at 3:30

For a random access iterator like that for vector, you don't need the temporarary. You can say:

if ( it + 1 == v.end() ) {
   // at one before end
}

Edit: And even for non-random access types one could use std:;distance:

if ( distance( it, v.end() ) == 1 ) {
   // at one before end
}
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An important question is: why create a loop if you do something special for 1 element. Why not do something special to the 3rd element? To every 4rth? ...

Just iterate over the elements to be treated the same, write separate code to treat the others.

Have a look at answers to this question, too.

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If you're using a vector, it's actually much simpler to use an integer index to iterate:

std::vector<int> myList;
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < myList.size(); i++)
{
  if (i == (myList.size() - 1))
  {
    processDifferently (myList[i])
  }
  else
  {
    process (myList[i])
  }
}

Minimizing the number of calls to myList.size() is left as an exercise for the OP :)

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