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I need to validate the number of digits to the right of the decimal (the scale)

0, is a valid number in any of the places (tenths, hundredths, thousandths, etc.).

Any tips or tricks?... w/o an extensive regex library, and no built in function, I would prefer a function that accepts the number, the number of places the scale should equal, and then return a bit.

Following up with Maess's suggestion I came up with this:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[GetScale] 
(
    @tsValue varchar(250)
    , @tiScale int
)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE
        @tiResult int
        , @tiValueScale int
        SET @tiResult = 0
        SELECT @tiValueScale =  LEN( SUBSTRING ( @tsValue, PATINDEX('%.%', @tsValue) + 1, LEN(@tsValue) ) )
        IF (@tiValueScale = @tiScale)
            SET @tiResult = 1
    RETURN @tiResult
END
GO

Seems to work as desired. Thanks for the help.

Just as a followup... i ran into an issue where a number didnt have a decimal (which returns the patindex to 0) and the number was the same size as the scale, it would return a false positive... so i add an additional select from the patindex to determine if it does exist or not... it now looks like this:

- =============================================
ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[GetScale] 
(
    @tsValue varchar(250)
    , @tiScale int
)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE
        @tiResult int
        , @tiValueScale int
        , @tiDecimalExists int

        SET @tiResult = 0
        SET @tiDecimalExists = 0

        SELECT @tiDecimalExists = PATINDEX('%.%', @tsValue)

        IF (@tiDecimalExists != 0)
        BEGIN
            SELECT @tiValueScale =  LEN( SUBSTRING ( @tsValue, @tiDecimalExists + 1, LEN(@tsValue) ) )
            IF (@tiValueScale = @tiScale)
                SET @tiResult = 1

        END
    RETURN @tiResult
END
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? If you want to do code-by-request then you should hire a consultant. Stack Overflow is for assistance with specific issues. –  JNK Dec 12 '11 at 19:30
2  
convert it to a string, parse it on the decimal and get the length of the string representing the digits to the right of the decimal. –  Maess Dec 12 '11 at 19:35
    
I've considered converting it to a string, but i was hoping to find something that felt less like a hack... it is probably what I'm going to end up doing at this point though anyway –  Patrick Dec 12 '11 at 19:41
    
@Charles answer to your question for it to be accepted :) –  aF. Dec 13 '11 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

I tried Anthony's solution with some success, but there is some undesirable side effects when the first whole number is 9.

For example...

   select 0.11 as fraction, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(0.11) dp union
   select 9.1, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(9.1) union
   select 9.01, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(9.01) union
   select 9.0, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(9.0) union
   select 99.0, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(99.0) union
   select 10999.0, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(10999.0) union
   select 8.0, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(8.0) union
   select 0, Math.NumberOfDecimalPlaces(0)

Produces...

0.00    0
0.11    2
8.00    0
9.00    -1
9.01    2
9.10    1
99.00   -2
10999.00    -3

Which shows some incorrect calculations when 9 is the first whole number.

I've made a small improvement to Anthony's original function.

CREATE FUNCTION [Math].[NumberOfDecimalPlaces]
(
    @fraction decimal(38,19)
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN FLOOR(LOG10(REVERSE(ABS(@fraction % 1) +1))) +1
END

This simply strips of the whole number part of the fraction. Which when implemented produces...

0.00    0
0.11    2
8.00    0
9.00    0
9.01    2
9.10    1
99.00   0
10999.00    0

The correct result

share|improve this answer
CREATE FUNCTION dbo.DecimalPlaces(@n decimal(38,19))
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN FLOOR(LOG10(REVERSE(ABS(@n % 1) + 1))) + 1
END

Edit (Feb 5 '15):

Thanks sqlconsumer. I have included your fix for nines before the decimal point.

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