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I am learning cedet for my c/c++ projects. However, I am facing difficulty in Make projects.

Say I have a file main.cpp that looks like this

//main.cpp
#include "temp.h"
blah... <c++ code>

and I have temp.h and temp.cpp

that look like this

//temp.h
some declarations

//temp.cpp
some definitions

Then in emacs+cedet, I do ede-new and then I add a target main using ede-new-target and add main.cpp to main.

Then I write temp.h and temp.cpp and add temp.cpp to target temp.

I choose all targets as program generating this Project.ede file

;; Object Test
;; EDE project file.
(ede-proj-project "Test"
  :name "Test"
  :file "Project.ede"
  :targets (list 
   (ede-proj-target-makefile-program "main"
    :name "main"
    :path ""
    :source '("main.cpp")
    )
   (ede-proj-target-makefile-program "temp"
    :name "temp"
    :path ""
    :source '("temp.cpp")
    )
   )
  )

Now when I generate the makefile using ede-proj-regenerate, it creates a Makefile that generates main.o and temp.o

The make however fails as the Makefile generated does not identify the dependency of main.cpp on temp.cpp. How can I tell cedet EDE to identify this dependency? What is wrong in what I am doing here?

And secondly, how do I tell it that I do not want main.o as this is the final target program/executable and not an object file.

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1 Answer 1

For your example, the created Makefile should be creating both main.o, and main. The name of the target you create should be the name of your program, so if you changed the target named "main" to "Pickle", it will create a main.o, and a Pickle program.

When you edit temp.cpp, you should add it to main, or Pickle if you choose to rename the target. Put all your source files for the program into the single target, unless you are choosing to create a library, in which case add temp to a library type target instead.

To "Fix things up", you can use the customize-project command to access all the other options not usually available via simple commands from Emacs proper. That will let you add dependencies on libraries, add your headers as aux src, and other useful things. Just read the doc strings associated with the different options.

A quick start for EDE can be found here.

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Due to several recent EDE questions, I've created a Quick start section of the EDE manual. You can see the built-bot version here: randomsample.de/cedetdocs/ede/ede/Quick-Start.html –  Eric Feb 24 '12 at 5:00
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