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I've a class Foo<T> which has a vector of smart pointers to Shape derived classes. I'm trying to implement an at(index) member function. Here's what I would to do intuitively:

Foo<float> myfoo;
std::unique_ptr<Shape<float>> shape_ptr = myfoo.at(i);
shape_ptr->doSomething(param1, param2, ...);

When defining the at(index) function, I'm getting a compiler error message. Note that the move constructor was defined and that the Shape base class is abstract. Below, I'm giving some code for illustration purposes.

Furthermore, I found recently on the web an example on how to overload the assignment operator using std::move. I usually follow the Copy-Swap idiom. Which of those two ways for overloading the mentioned operator makes sense for my case? Below, I'm also illustrating the function's definition.

template < typename T >
class Foo{

    public:

        Foo();
        Foo( Foo && );
        ~Foo();

        void swap(Foo<T> &);
        //Foo<T> & operator =( Foo<T> );
        Foo<T> & operator =( Foo<T> && );

        std::unique_ptr<Shape<T> > at ( int ) const; // error here!

        int size() const;

    private:

        std::vector< std::unique_ptr<Shape<T> > > m_Bank;
};

template < typename T >
Foo<T>::Foo( Foo && other)
    :m_Bank(std::move(other.m_Bank))
{

}

/*template < typename T >
void Filterbank<T>::swap(Filterbank<T> & refBank ){

    using std::swap;
    swap(m_Bank, refBank.m_Bank);
}

template < typename T >
Foo<T> & Filterbank<T>::operator =( Foo<T> bank ){

    bank.swap(*this);
    return (*this);
}*/

template < typename T >
Foo<T> & Foo<T>::operator =( Foo<T> && bank ){

    //bank.swap(*this);
    m_Bank = std::move(bank.m_Bank);
    return (*this);
}

template < typename T >
std::unique_ptr<Shape<T> > Foo<T>::at( int index ) const{
    return m_Bank[index]; // Error here! => error C2248: 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>::unique_ptr' : cannot access private member declared in class 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>'
}
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1  
Unique pointers have unique ownership semantics, so it makes no sense to make a copy of one. What do you want to happen? Do you want a deep copy of the object? –  Kerrek SB Dec 12 '11 at 19:52
    
@KerrekSB, no, i don't want a deep copy of the object. The idea is that i first fill the Shape m_Bank vector. Once it's filled, I just want to call the corresponding doSomething function (e.g triangle->doSomething(), square->doSomething), sth. like: myfoo.m_Bank.at(i)->doSomething(param1, param2, ...); but the m_Bank is a private class member, therefore, I need a member function that allows me to access the element at index i –  Tin Dec 12 '11 at 19:57
    
Such an interface would be extremely surprising (i.e. "bad"), because you could only ever call at(i) once, with std::move, and it would destroy the vector's element value. Do you want a shared pointer instead? If you really just want the vector as a staging area, then I think you need to reconsider the design. –  Kerrek SB Dec 12 '11 at 19:59
    
@KerrekSB, I don't need to return actually the unique_ptr, I just wanted to have an interface that allows me to do: myfoo.m_Bank.at(i)->doSomething(param1, param2, ...); from the main.cpp. Given that m_Bank is private I can't access the vector, therefore I was lookinf for an class interface. –  Tin Dec 12 '11 at 20:07
    
Well, you could expose the raw pointer (m_Bank[i].get()), but you might not like the idea that someone could try to delete that pointer (though that wouldn't be your fault). Alternatively, you could implement myfoo.doSomething(i, param1, param2, ...)... –  Kerrek SB Dec 12 '11 at 20:28
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Q1: What to do with Foo::at( int ) const such that you can:

myfoo.at(i)->doSomething(param1, param2, ...);

without transferring ownership out of the vector<unique_ptr<Shape<T>>>.

A1: Foo::at( int ) const should return a const std::unique_ptr<Shape<T> >&:

template < typename T >
const std::unique_ptr<Shape<T> >&
Foo<T>::at( int index ) const
{
    return m_Bank[index];
}

Now your can dereference the const unique_ptr and call any member of Shape they want (const or non-const). If they accidentally try to copy the unique_ptr, (which would transfer ownership out of Foo) they will get a compile time error.

This solution is better than returning a non-const reference to unique_ptr as it catches accidental ownership transfers out of Foo. However if you want to allow ownership transfers out of Foo via at, then a non-const reference would be more appropriate.

Q2: Furthermore, I found recently on the web an example on how to overload the assignment operator using std::move. I usually follow the Copy-Swap idiom. Which of those two ways for overloading the mentioned operator makes sense for my case?

A2: I'm not sure what ~Foo() does. If it doesn't do anything, you could remove it, and then (assuming fully conforming C++11) you would automatically get correct and optimal move constructor and move assignment operator (and the proper deleted copy semantics).

If you can't remove ~Foo() (because it does something important), or if your compiler does not yet implement automatic move generation, you can supply them explicitly, as you have done in your question.

Your move constructor is spot on: Move construct the member.

Your move assignment should be similar (and is what would be automatically generated if ~Foo() is implicit): Move assign the member:

template < typename T >
Foo<T> & Foo<T>::operator =( Foo<T> && bank )
{
    m_Bank = std::move(bank.m_Bank);
    return (*this);
}

Your Foo design lends itself to being Swappable too, and that is always good to supply:

friend void swap(Foo& x, Foo& y) {x.m_Bank.swap(y.m_Bank);}

Without this explicit swap, your Foo is still Swappable using Foo's move constructor and move assignment. However this explicit swap is roughly twice as fast as the implicit one.

The above advice is all aimed at getting the very highest performance out of Foo. You can use the Copy-Swap idiom in your move assignment if you want. It will be correct and slightly slower. Though if you do be careful that you don't get infinite recursion with swap calling move assignment and move assignment calling swap! :-) Indeed, that gotcha is just another reason to cleanly (and optimally) separate swap and move assignment.

Update

Assuming Shape looks like this, here is one way to code the move constructor, move assignment, copy constructor and copy assignment operators for Foo, assuming Foo has a single data member:

std::vector< std::unique_ptr< Shape > > m_Bank;

...

Foo::Foo(Foo&& other)
    : m_Bank(std::move(other.m_Bank))
{
}

Foo::Foo(const Foo& other)
{
    for (const auto& p: other.m_Bank)
        m_Bank.push_back(std::unique_ptr< Shape >(p ? p->clone() : nullptr));
}

Foo&
Foo::operator=(Foo&& other)
{
    m_Bank = std::move(other.m_Bank);
    return (*this);
}

Foo&
Foo::operator=(const Foo& other)
{
    if (this != &other)
    {
        m_Bank.clear();
        for (const auto& p: other.m_Bank)
            m_Bank.push_back(std::unique_ptr< Shape >(p ? p->clone() : nullptr));
    }
    return (*this);
}

If your compiler supports defaulted move members, the same thing could be achieved with:

    Foo(Foo&&) = default;
    Foo& operator=(Foo&&) = default;

for the move constructor and move assignment operator.

The above ensures that at all times each Shape is owned by only one smart pointer/vector/Foo. If you would rather that multiple Foos share ownership of Shapes, then you can have as your data member:

std::vector< std::shared_ptr< Shape > > m_Bank;

And you can default all of move constructor, move assignment, copy constructor and copy assignment.

share|improve this answer
    
@ Howard, nice explanation! In regard to your answer A1: if you want to allow ownership transfers out of Foo via at, then a non-const reference would be more appropriate.. It's actually not my case, but to clear my doubt, is it actually really a transfer when I set the return type as a non-const reference? This would mean that the element in turn at the vector will be then deleted,is it right? From what I understand, the last const is to ensure that the state of the object is not going to be changed and the first const is to ensure the retrieved element does not change, right? –  Tin Dec 13 '11 at 15:47
    
@ Howard, one more thing. How could I use the at() member function you proposed? I was thinking sth. like: std::unique_ptr<Shape<float> > ptrShape (foo_obj.at(i)) or std::unique_ptr<Shape<float> > ptrShape = foo_obj.at(i). However, I get the following compiler error message: error C2248: 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>::unique_ptr' : cannot access private member declared in class 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>' –  Tin Dec 13 '11 at 16:07
    
@Tin: If you returned a unique_ptr by non-const reference, that would allow clients to move from it, thus leaving a null-valued unique_ptr in the vector. But one can not move from a const unique_ptr& (you get a compile time error if you try). If at returned a unique_ptr by value (as in your question), you can make that work too with return move(m_Bank[index]);, however that means that every time the client calls at(i), the ownership is transferred to the client, with no explicit act required by the client. –  Howard Hinnant Dec 13 '11 at 17:25
    
@Tin: The first const is to ensure that ownership is not transferred out of Foo. The second const ensures that nothing about Foo changes (such as the size of the vector). There is nothing here that prevents a change to the Shape. I.e. you can call a non-const member function on Shape with this design. –  Howard Hinnant Dec 13 '11 at 17:26
    
@Tin: The way to use this is very similar to how you described in a comment under your question: myfoo.at(i)->doSomething(param1, param2, ...);. If you try to make a copy of the const unique_ptr& returned by at, that results in a compile time error (as you noted in your comment). That copy would represent a ownership transfer out of the vector. –  Howard Hinnant Dec 13 '11 at 17:29
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Use Boost's pointer containers instead of a standard container with unique_ptr. They're designed for this kind of usage.

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It is pretty trivial to wrap a std::vector to make your own simplified version of this. –  nullspace Nov 5 '12 at 9:14
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I think you should be using shared_ptr here instead.

Only one unique_ptr can own the shared resource. If you are able to do what you intend ie return a unique_ptr by value then the one in the vector will be destroyed which is probably what you don't want.

share|improve this answer
    
@ parapura, I basically need to call the corresponding doSomething function of the element at index i of my vector. It doesn't need to return a unique_ptr. I just need to do sth. like: bar = myfoo.m_Bank.at(i)->doSomething(param1, param2, ...); in the main.cpp, but the m_Bank is a private class member. –  Tin Dec 12 '11 at 20:06
    
@ parapura, when using shared_ptr, then there's no need for defining either move constructor or move assignment operator, right? –  Tin Dec 14 '11 at 14:35
    
@Tin: The copy constructor and copy assignment for vector<shared_ptr<T>> are O(N). The copy constructor will require one memory allocation. The copy assignment operator may require a deallocation, and an allocation. The move constructor of a vector<shared_ptr<T>> is O(1) and will not require any memory allocation or deallocation. The move assignment is in general O(N) and may require a deallocation, but will not require an allocation. In the typical use case for the move assignment operator, it is O(1) and the deallocation will not be required. –  Howard Hinnant Dec 14 '11 at 15:32
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It seems like you should just be returning a reference here:

Shape<T> & Foo<T>::at( int index ) const{
    return *m_Bank[index];
}
share|improve this answer
    
@ Benjamin, the std::vector would be shared_ptr or unique_ptr? By following your solution, when the at function exit, what happens exactly? –  Tin Dec 12 '11 at 20:13
    
@Tin: "the std::vector would be shared_ptr or unique_ptr?" -- That's up to you. I was under the impression that you didn't want to change it. If you do change it to shared_ptr, then you can just return a shared_ptr, or a weak_ptr. But if you keep it as unique_ptr, that's where my solution applies. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 12 '11 at 20:16
    
@Tin: "when the at function exit, what happens exactly?" -- You have a reference to the object that the unique_ptr points to. And you can call methods of Shape<T> on it, i.e. myfoo.at(i).doSomething() –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 12 '11 at 20:17
    
@ Benjamin, and since we have only the reference to the object (not actually std::moving the pointer), the element is no longer destroyed from the vector, right? –  Tin Dec 12 '11 at 20:20
    
@Tin: That is correct. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 12 '11 at 20:21
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