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When compiling my project mixing C and C++ heavily I get this error (this when compiling C++ file):

/usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++locale.h:
In function ‘int std::__convert_from_v(__locale_struct* const&, char*, int, const char*, ...)’:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++locale.h:70:3:
sorry, unimplemented:
function ‘int std::__convert_from_v(__locale_struct* const&, char*, int, const char*, ...)’
can never be inlined because it uses variable argument lists

And compilation ends.

But when I manually edit file /usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++locale.h and delete the inline modifier before __convert_from_v it WORKS.

The function header causing problems is with inline originally:

inline int
__convert_from_v(const __c_locale& __cloc __attribute__ ((__unused__)),
                   char* __out,
                   const int __size __attribute__ ((__unused__)),
                   const char* __fmt, ...)

I guess function like that SHOULD NOT be marked as inline. Is it bug or am I doing something wrong??? [gcc 4.6.1, Ubuntu 11.10]

share|improve this question
    
Are you directly including this file? Whats the full error? –  Adrian Cornish Dec 12 '11 at 19:54
    
It'd help if you localized the error to a small piece of code and posted it. –  vitaut Dec 12 '11 at 19:56
4  
This is a file that is almost always used when compiling a nontrivial C++ project. It is far from liklely that this is faulty. It is more likely that your project and/or compiler invocation is to blame. But without seeing a minimal self contained code example along with the compiler invocation used to compile it, we can't tell for sure. –  PlasmaHH Dec 12 '11 at 19:58
    
@PlasmaHH: Do you have any idea, which files do include it? For example? –  Cartesius00 Dec 12 '11 at 20:02
1  
Use g++ -H to print include stack –  Adrian Cornish Dec 12 '11 at 20:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It is likely due to optimization settings or redefinition of inline that force __convert_from_v to be inlined. Here's a small artificial example that reproduces the error:

#define inline __always_inline
#include <bits/c++locale.h>

int main () {
  __locale_t loc;
  return std::__convert_from_v(loc, 0, 0, 0);
}

Compiling with g++ 4.6.1 on Ubuntu 11.10 gives the error:

/usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++locale.h: In function ‘int std::__convert_from_v(__locale_struct* const&, char*, int, const char*, ...)’:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++locale.h:70:3: sorry, unimplemented: function ‘int std::__convert_from_v(__locale_struct* const&, char*, int, const char*, ...)’ can never be inlined because it uses variable argument lists

So check your code for redefinition of inline or try different optimization settings.

I think the reason this function is marked as inline is because it is defined in a header. Without inline you'd get it defined in every translation unit that includes (normally indirectly) this header.

share|improve this answer
    
Oooooooh... YES! We have that macro for treating inline as always_inline. Fantastic point. Thank you very much. –  Cartesius00 Dec 12 '11 at 21:43
    
@James: You are welcome. –  vitaut Dec 12 '11 at 21:55

C prior to C99 doesn't have the inline keyword. Check your compiler configuration.

share|improve this answer
    
How is it relevant? The code in question is a C++ code. –  vitaut Dec 12 '11 at 21:31
    
He said: "When compiling my project mixing C and C++ heavily I get this error" –  haole Dec 12 '11 at 21:37

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