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I would like to find the easiest way to be sure about the scope of variables.

Seeing at next example (jsfiddle):

var foo = function() {
    var bar = function() {
        pub = "public";
        var pri = "private";

        alert(pub) // public
        alert(pri) // private
    };

    // alert(pub) // pub not defined
    bar();
    alert(pub) // public
    // alert(pri) // pri not defined
};

foo();
alert(pub) // public
// alert(pri) // pri not defined

Can I say that:

1.- All variable prefixed with var keyword will be visible inside its function and all their nested function?
2.- All variable without var keyword will be visible everywhere after (his function container) be executed?

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this is an interesting question but one which I would avoid in practice. I believe using var scopes the variable to the current scope.. not using it will make the variable use no scope (global). –  jsobo Dec 12 '11 at 20:08
2  
Don't exclude var. If you intend a global, make it explicit. Run code in strict mode to ensure you haven't accidentally made an implicit global. –  RightSaidFred Dec 12 '11 at 20:15
    
@RightSaidFred +1 for strict mode. –  Domenic Dec 12 '11 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. That is true, unless they are shadowed by another inner definition of the same variable.
  2. All variables without var will be global, unless they've already been defined by an outer scope.

Since people mentioned globals...

You shouldn't use globals, always declare your variables with var to avoid confusion. If you must use them, scope them to a global namespace that is used for your code. This will help you avoid collisions with other code on the page.

var ns = {};
// Now use this anywhere in your code
ns.myGlobal = 49;
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5  
And it's worth adding: global variables are evil, and declaring them implicitly by omitting var is super-evil!! –  Domenic Dec 12 '11 at 20:06
    
+1 *I am learning about clousures and so on, but I want left clear some basics*. So we can conclude that **1.-** Always define variables with var` (obviously where must be done, either in global or local scope) 2.- All variables will be visible in their nested scopes (starting in the global scope). –  Igor Parra Dec 12 '11 at 20:35
    
@juan-mendes can you please comment this last one? waiting to approve this answer... o/\o –  Igor Parra Dec 13 '11 at 1:39
    
@NomikOS: Yes, you should always use var. Yes, variables will be visible in nested scopes, unless you redefine it in an inner scope, in which case the variable has been shadowed –  Juan Mendes Dec 13 '11 at 2:05
    
@juan-mendes GREAT! –  Igor Parra Dec 13 '11 at 13:35

Yes. You've understood it correctly.

Think of any variable with the keyword "var" in front of it as visible to that function and it's nested functions. Think of any variable without the keyword "var" in front of it as window.variable.

var foo = function() {
    var bar = function() {
        pub = "public";
        var pri = "private";

        alert(pub) // public
        alert(pri) // private
    };

    // alert(pub) // pub not defined
    bar();
    alert(pub) // public
    alert(pri) // pri not defined
};

foo();
alert(pub) // public
alert(pri) // pri not defined

As a general rule of thumb you shouldn't use global variables.

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Great point. I should not assume that that global object is "window". –  Jesse Atkinson Dec 13 '11 at 14:21

Check this out for more clarity...

var foo = function() {
    var pri = "OUTER";// this is what I changed...
    var bar = function() {
        pub = "public";
        var pri = "private";

        alert(pub) // public
        alert(pri) // private
    };

    // alert(pub) // pub not defined
    bar();
    alert(pub) // public
    alert(pri) // pri not defined
};

foo();
alert(pub) // public
alert(pri) // pri not defined
share|improve this answer
    
you right jsobo, but this is not an answer. THX anyway... :) –  Igor Parra Dec 12 '11 at 20:36
    
I didn't expect to get credit but pasting code in a comment doesn't work so well... and the previous answer was good... sorry to clutter your question ... I just thought the code example was interesting –  jsobo Dec 13 '11 at 18:30

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