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Is there a faster way to rotate a large bitmap by 90 or 270 degrees than simply doing a nested loop with inverted coordinates?

The bitmaps are 8bpp and typically 2048*2400*8bpp

Currently I do this by simply copying with argument inversion, roughly (pseudo code:

for x = 0 to 2048-1
  for y = 0 to 2048-1
    dest[x][y]=src[y][x];

(In reality I do it with pointers, for a bit more speed, but that is roughly the same magnitude)

GDI is quite slow with large images, and GPU load/store times for textures (GF7 cards) are in the same magnitude as the current CPU time.

Any tips, pointers? An in-place algorithm would even be better, but speed is more important than being in-place.

Target is Delphi, but it is more an algorithmic question. SSE(2) vectorization no problem, it is a big enough problem for me to code it in assembler


Follow up to Nils' answer

  • Image 2048x2700 -> 2700x2048
  • Compiler Turbo Explorer 2006 with optimization on.
  • Windows: Power scheme set to "Always on". (important!!!!)
  • Machine: Core2 6600 (2.4 GHz)

time with old routine: 32ms (step 1)

time with stepsize 8 : 12ms

time with stepsize 16 : 10ms

time with stepsize 32+ : 9ms

Meanwhile I also tested on a Athlon 64 X2 (5200+ iirc), and the speed up there was slightly more than a factor four (80 to 19 ms).

The speed up is well worth it, thanks. Maybe that during the summer months I'll torture myself with a SSE(2) version. However I already thought about how to tackle that, and I think I'll run out of SSE2 registers for an straight implementation:

for n:=0 to 7 do
  begin
    load r0, <source+n*rowsize> 
    shift byte from r0 into r1
    shift byte from r0 into r2
    ..
    shift byte from r0 into r8
  end; 
store r1, <target>   
store r2, <target+1*<rowsize>
..
store r8, <target+7*<rowsize>   

So 8x8 needs 9 registers, but 32-bits SSE only has 8. Anyway that is something for the summer months :-)

Note that the pointer thing is something that I do out of instinct, but it could be there is actually something to it, if your dimensions are not hardcoded, the compiler can't turn the mul into a shift. While muls an sich are cheap nowadays, they also generate more register pressure afaik.

The code (validated by subtracting result from the "naieve" rotate1 implementation):

const stepsize = 32;
procedure rotatealign(Source: tbw8image; Target:tbw8image);

var stepsx,stepsy,restx,resty : Integer;
   RowPitchSource, RowPitchTarget : Integer;
   pSource, pTarget,ps1,ps2 : pchar;
   x,y,i,j: integer;
   rpstep : integer;
begin
  RowPitchSource := source.RowPitch;          // bytes to jump to next line. Can be negative (includes alignment)
  RowPitchTarget := target.RowPitch;        rpstep:=RowPitchTarget*stepsize;
  stepsx:=source.ImageWidth div stepsize;
  stepsy:=source.ImageHeight div stepsize;
  // check if mod 16=0 here for both dimensions, if so -> SSE2.
  for y := 0 to stepsy - 1 do
    begin
      psource:=source.GetImagePointer(0,y*stepsize);    // gets pointer to pixel x,y
      ptarget:=Target.GetImagePointer(target.imagewidth-(y+1)*stepsize,0);
      for x := 0 to stepsx - 1 do
        begin
          for i := 0 to stepsize - 1 do
            begin
              ps1:=@psource[rowpitchsource*i];   // ( 0,i)
              ps2:=@ptarget[stepsize-1-i];       //  (maxx-i,0);
              for j := 0 to stepsize - 1 do
               begin
                 ps2[0]:=ps1[j];
                 inc(ps2,RowPitchTarget);
               end;
            end;
          inc(psource,stepsize);
          inc(ptarget,rpstep);
        end;
    end;
  // 3 more areas to do, with dimensions
  // - stepsy*stepsize * restx        // right most column of restx width
  // - stepsx*stepsize * resty        // bottom row with resty height
  // - restx*resty                    // bottom-right rectangle.
  restx:=source.ImageWidth mod stepsize;   // typically zero because width is 
                                          // typically 1024 or 2048
  resty:=source.Imageheight mod stepsize;
  if restx>0 then
    begin
      // one loop less, since we know this fits in one line of  "blocks"
      psource:=source.GetImagePointer(source.ImageWidth-restx,0);    // gets pointer to pixel x,y
      ptarget:=Target.GetImagePointer(Target.imagewidth-stepsize,Target.imageheight-restx);
      for y := 0 to stepsy - 1 do
        begin
          for i := 0 to stepsize - 1 do
            begin
              ps1:=@psource[rowpitchsource*i];   // ( 0,i)
              ps2:=@ptarget[stepsize-1-i];       //  (maxx-i,0);
              for j := 0 to restx - 1 do
               begin
                 ps2[0]:=ps1[j];
                 inc(ps2,RowPitchTarget);
               end;
            end;
         inc(psource,stepsize*RowPitchSource);
         dec(ptarget,stepsize);
       end;
    end;
  if resty>0 then
    begin
      // one loop less, since we know this fits in one line of  "blocks"
      psource:=source.GetImagePointer(0,source.ImageHeight-resty);    // gets pointer to pixel x,y
      ptarget:=Target.GetImagePointer(0,0);
      for x := 0 to stepsx - 1 do
        begin
          for i := 0 to resty- 1 do
            begin
              ps1:=@psource[rowpitchsource*i];   // ( 0,i)
              ps2:=@ptarget[resty-1-i];       //  (maxx-i,0);
              for j := 0 to stepsize - 1 do
               begin
                 ps2[0]:=ps1[j];
                 inc(ps2,RowPitchTarget);
               end;
            end;
         inc(psource,stepsize);
         inc(ptarget,rpstep);
       end;
    end;
 if (resty>0) and (restx>0) then
    begin
      // another loop less, since only one block
      psource:=source.GetImagePointer(source.ImageWidth-restx,source.ImageHeight-resty);    // gets pointer to pixel x,y
      ptarget:=Target.GetImagePointer(0,target.ImageHeight-restx);
      for i := 0 to resty- 1 do
        begin
          ps1:=@psource[rowpitchsource*i];   // ( 0,i)
          ps2:=@ptarget[resty-1-i];       //  (maxx-i,0);
          for j := 0 to restx - 1 do
            begin
              ps2[0]:=ps1[j];
              inc(ps2,RowPitchTarget);
            end;
       end;
    end;
end;

Update 2 Generics

I tried to update this code to a generics version in Delphi XE. I failed because of QC 99703, and forum people have already confirmed it also exists in XE2. Please vote for it :-)

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5 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Yes, there are faster ways to do this.

Your simple loop spends most of the time in cache misses. This happends because you touch a lot of data at very different places in a tight loop. Even worse: Your memory locations are exactly a power of two apart. That's a size where the cache performs worst.

You can improve this rotation algorithm if you improve the locality of your memory accesses.

A simple way to do this would be to rotate each 8x8 pixel block on it's own using the same code you've used for your whole bitmap, and wrap another loop that splits the image rotation into chunks of 8x8 pixels each.

E.g. something like this (not checked, and sorry for the C-code. My Delphi skills aren't up to date):

 // this is the outer-loop that breaks your image rotation
 // into chunks of 8x8 pixels each:
 for (int block_x = 0; block_x < 2048; block_x+=8)
 {
    for (int block_y = 0; blocky_y < 2048; block_y+=8)
    { 
       // this is the inner-loop that processes a block
       // of 8x8 pixels.
       for (int x= 0; x<8; x++)
         for (int y=0; y<8; y++)
            dest[x+block_x][y+block_y] = src[y+block_y][x+block_x]
    }
 }

There are other ways as well. You could process the data in Hilbert-Order or Morton-Order. That would be in theory even a bit faster, but the code will be much more complex.

Btw - Since you've mentioned that SSE is an option for you. Note that you can rotate a 8x8 byte block within the SSE-registers. It's a bit tricky to get it working, but looking at SSE matrix transpose code should get you started as it's the same thing.


EDIT:

Just checked:

With a block-size of 8x8 pixels the code runs ca. 5 times faster on my machine. With a block-size of 16x16 it runs 10 times faster.

Seems like it's a good idea to experiment with different block-sizes.

Here is the (very simple) test-program I've used:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>

char temp1[2048*2048];
char temp2[2048*2048];

void rotate1 (void)
{
  int x,y;
  for (y=0; y<2048; y++)
  for (x=0; x<2048; x++)
    temp2[2048*y+x] = temp1[2048*x+y];
}

void rotate2 (void)
{
  int x,y;
  int bx, by;

  for (by=0; by<2048; by+=8)
  for (bx=0; bx<2048; bx+=8)
  for (y=0; y<8; y++)
  for (x=0; x<8; x++)
    temp2[2048*(y+by)+x+bx] = temp1[2048*(x+bx)+y+by];
}

void rotate3 (void)
{
  int x,y;
  int bx, by;

  for (by=0; by<2048; by+=16)
  for (bx=0; bx<2048; bx+=16)
  for (y=0; y<16; y++)
  for (x=0; x<16; x++)
    temp2[2048*(y+by)+x+bx] = temp1[2048*(x+bx)+y+by];
}


int main (int argc, char **args)
{
  int i, t1;

  t1 = GetTickCount();
  for (i=0; i<20; i++) rotate1();
  printf ("%d\n", GetTickCount()-t1);

  t1 = GetTickCount();
  for (i=0; i<20; i++) rotate2();
  printf ("%d\n", GetTickCount()-t1);

  t1 = GetTickCount();
  for (i=0; i<20; i++) rotate3();
  printf ("%d\n", GetTickCount()-t1);

}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thank you. That sounds very promising. A 10 times speed up would be enough for now, something I would not bother messing with SSE for. At least not now. I had a rough feeling about doing it in small blocks, and this both confirms it and provides me with an implementation. –  Marco van de Voort May 11 '09 at 14:27
7  
The technique is called loop-tiling btw. Oh - and don't forget that you can parallelize the scaling. Just start two threads and let each one handle half of the image. –  Nils Pipenbrinck May 11 '09 at 14:40
    
Naah, already have a core dedicated to each camera ;-) –  Marco van de Voort May 11 '09 at 15:09
1  
Btw Marco, Once you've implemented it, let us know how much of a speed up you had. I'm just curious how it performs in a real-world application. –  Nils Pipenbrinck May 11 '09 at 17:33
1  
Done, I updated the question –  Marco van de Voort Nov 15 '09 at 16:43
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If you can use C++ then you may want to look at Eigen.

It is a C++ template library that uses SSE (2 and later) and AltiVec instruction sets with graceful fallback to non-vectorized code.

Fast. (See benchmark).
Expression templates allow to intelligently remove temporaries and enable lazy evaluation, when that is appropriate -- Eigen takes care of this automatically and handles aliasing too in most cases.
Explicit vectorization is performed for the SSE (2 and later) and AltiVec instruction sets, with graceful fallback to non-vectorized code. Expression templates allow to perform these optimizations globally for whole expressions.
With fixed-size objects, dynamic memory allocation is avoided, and the loops are unrolled when that makes sense.
For large matrices, special attention is paid to cache-friendliness.

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1  
The problem with such libraries is that the transformation of the format you have to the format the library uses, is usually already in the magnitude of the possible gain. –  Marco van de Voort Nov 15 '09 at 16:44
    
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You might be able to improve it by copying in cache-aligned blocks rather than by rows, as at the moment the stride of either src dest will be a miss ( depending whether delphi is row major or column major ).

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(Isn't the problem that one of both sides of the = is always unaligned? Either I walk src linearly or dst, but never both at once) –  Marco van de Voort May 11 '09 at 13:18
    
No, you can copy a block and transpose it within the cache as Nils demonstrates ( assuming the machine he's on has 256 byte cache lines ) –  Pete Kirkham May 11 '09 at 14:44
    
Ok, sorry, then I got it wrong, yes Nils answer is what I was looking for –  Marco van de Voort May 11 '09 at 18:18
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http://stackoverflow.com/questions/42519/how-do-you-rotate-a-two-dimensional-array

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As far as I can quickly see, none of the answers address cache effects, the trouble I was looking for, and what the accepted answer addresses. –  Marco van de Voort May 11 '09 at 14:32
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If the image isn't square, you can't do in-place. Even if you work in square images, the transform isn't conducive to in-place work.

If you want to try to do things a little faster, you can try to take advantage of the row strides to make it work, but I think the best you would do is to read 4 bytes at a time in a long from the source and then write it into four consecutive rows in the dest. That should cut some of your overhead, but I wouldn't expect more than a 5% improvement.

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Correct, but I have several different use cases, and could be inplace, e.g. by enlarging the image lightly so that it is square. It is one of the more minor usecases though. As you can see below, the speedup is quite dramatic (300-400%). But inplace would cost speed since you can't simply exchange blocks, but would have to rotate through 4 x 90 degrees, so I decided not to push that and take the copy for granted now. –  Marco van de Voort May 18 '09 at 8:16
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