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I'm Pulling my hair out. I've been trying for 5 hours to get a freakin texture on this square can't seem to make it happen. At this point i've butchered this code moving stuff around trying to get it to work, but here's what I have...

It creates a spinning square, that spins a certain speed depending on coordinates touched. That all works fine, but for the life of me I can't get it to draw the texture. What do I need to change?

Here's the entire Renderer class

public class VortexRenderer implements GLSurfaceView.Renderer {
    private static final String LOG_TAG = VortexRenderer.class.getSimpleName();

    private float _red = 0.9f;
    private float _green = 0.2f;
    private float _blue = 0.2f;
    public Bitmap bitmap;

    public VortexRenderer(Context context) {
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
        bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(context.getResources(),
                R.drawable.texturetest);

    }


    private FloatBuffer mTextureBuffer;
    @Override
    public void onSurfaceCreated(GL10 gl, EGLConfig config) {
        gl.glEnableClientState(GL10.GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
        gl.glEnableClientState(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);
        int[] textures = new int[1];
     // Tell OpenGL to generate textures.
        gl.glGenTextures(1, textures, 0);
        gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[0]);
        gl.glTexParameterf(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D,
                GL10.GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER,
                GL10.GL_LINEAR);
        gl.glTexParameterf(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D,
                GL10.GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER,
                GL10.GL_LINEAR);
        float textureCoordinates[] = {0.0f, 1.0f,
                1.0f, 1.0f,
                0.0f, 0.0f,
                1.0f, 0.0f };
        gl.glTexParameterf(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D,
                GL10.GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S,
                GL10.GL_REPEAT);
        gl.glTexParameterf(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D,
                GL10.GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T,
                GL10.GL_REPEAT);
        GLUtils.texImage2D(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, bitmap, 0);

        ByteBuffer byteBuf = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(textureCoordinates.length * 4);
        byteBuf.order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder());
        mTextureBuffer = byteBuf.asFloatBuffer();
        mTextureBuffer.put(textureCoordinates);
        mTextureBuffer.position(0);

            gl.glEnable(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D);
         // Tell OpenGL where our texture is located.
         gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[0]);
         // Tell OpenGL to enable the use of UV coordinates.
         gl.glEnableClientState(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);
         // Telling OpenGL where our UV coordinates are.
         gl.glTexCoordPointer(2, GL10.GL_FLOAT, 0, mTextureBuffer);

        initTriangle();

    }

    @Override
    public void onSurfaceChanged(GL10 gl, int w, int h) {
        gl.glViewport(0, 0, w, h);
    }

    @Override
    public void onDrawFrame(GL10 gl) {
         // define the color we want to be displayed as the "clipping wall"
        gl.glClearColor(_red, _green, _blue, 1.0f);

        // clear the color buffer to show the ClearColor we called above...
        gl.glClear(GL10.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

        gl.glRotatef(_angle, 0f, 1f, 0f);
        // set the color of our element
        gl.glColor4f(0.5f, 0f, 0f, 0.5f);

        // define the vertices we want to draw
        gl.glVertexPointer(3, GL10.GL_FLOAT, 0, _vertexBuffer);
        gl.glEnable(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D);
        // Enable the texture state
        gl.glEnableClientState(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);

        // Point to our buffers
        gl.glTexCoordPointer(2, GL10.GL_FLOAT, 0, mTextureBuffer);



        // finally draw the vertices
        gl.glDrawElements(GL10.GL_TRIANGLE_FAN, _nrOfVertices, GL10.GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, _indexBuffer);




   }


    private float _angle;

    public void setAngle(float angle) {
        _angle = angle;
    }


    public void setColor(float r, float g, float b) {
        _red = r;
        _green = g;
        _blue = b;
    } 

     // new object variables we need
     // a raw buffer to hold indices
     private ShortBuffer _indexBuffer;

     // a raw buffer to hold the vertices
     private FloatBuffer _vertexBuffer;

     private short[] _indicesArray = {0, 1 ,2,3};
     private int _nrOfVertices = 4;



     private void initTriangle() {

         // float has 4 bytes
         ByteBuffer vbb = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(_nrOfVertices * 4 * 4);
         vbb.order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder());
         _vertexBuffer = vbb.asFloatBuffer();

         // short has 2 bytes
         ByteBuffer ibb = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(_nrOfVertices * 2);
         ibb.order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder());
         _indexBuffer = ibb.asShortBuffer();

         float[] coords = {
            -0.5f, -0.5f, 0f, // (x1, y1, z1)
             0.5f, -0.5f, 0f, // (x2, y2, z2)
             0.5f, 0.5f, 0f, // (x3, y3, z3)
             -0.5f, 0.5f, 0f
         };

         _vertexBuffer.put(coords);
         _indexBuffer.put(_indicesArray);

         _vertexBuffer.position(0);
         _indexBuffer.position(0);
     }
}

I know allot of stuff is put in weird places, I've literally spent hours just moving stuff around trying to make it work lol.

OpenGL ES sure better be worth this learning curve.

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try calling

gl.glTexEnvf(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL10.GL_TEXTURE_ENV_MODE, GL10.GL_REPLACE);

After you have set your texture parameters.
Also, it is usually a good idea to make sure your texture dimensions are multiples of 2 (e.g. 32x32, 64x64, 128x128...) when working in openGL.

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