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I'm designing a database in Access 2010.

I have this query that works as I want it to:

    SELECT Participants.ParticipantID, [FirstName]+' '+[LastName] AS Participant
    FROM Participants
    WHERE (((Participants.SiteName)=forms!DailyWorkshops!SiteName) And 
((Participants.YearLookup)=forms!DailyWorkshops!YearLookup))
    ORDER BY Participants.FirstName, Participants.LastName;

Now I want another query that gives me everything else.

ie

    SELECT Participants.ParticipantID, [FirstName]+' '+[LastName] AS Participant
    FROM Participants

    WHERE 

    **exclude all these results 
    (((Participants.SiteName)=forms!DailyWorkshops!SiteName) And
 ((Participants.YearLookup)=forms!DailyWorkshops!YearLookup))**


    ORDER BY Participants.FirstName, Participants.LastName;

This seems to work but I was wondering, is this the most straightforward way to do this?

    SELECT Participants.ParticipantID, [FirstName]+' '+[LastName] AS Participant
    FROM Participants
    WHERE Participants.ParticipantID NOT IN 

    (SELECT Participants.ParticipantID FROM Participants WHERE 
     (((Participants.SiteName)=forms!DailyWorkshops!SiteName) And 
((Participants.YearLookup)=forms!DailyWorkshops!YearLookup)))
    ORDER BY Participants.FirstName, Participants.LastName;
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why is this not very simple...

SELECT Participants.ParticipantID, [FirstName]+' '+[LastName] AS Participant
FROM Participants
WHERE 
    NOT 
       (((Participants.SiteName)=forms!DailyWorkshops!SiteName) And
        ((Participants.YearLookup)=forms!DailyWorkshops!YearLookup))
ORDER BY Participants.FirstName, Participants.LastName;

The only reason may be because of nulls in your columns, which you can fix with:

SELECT Participants.ParticipantID, [FirstName]+' '+[LastName] AS Participant
FROM Participants
WHERE 
    NOT 
       (((Participants.SiteName)=forms!DailyWorkshops!SiteName OR
             IsNull(Participants.SiteName)) And
        ((Participants.YearLookup)=forms!DailyWorkshops!YearLookup OR
             IsNull(Participants.YearLookup)))
ORDER BY Participants.FirstName, Participants.LastName;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks - that works. I didn't realize you could just do that and not have a full subquery nested in there. These are all required fields so there are no NULL values. But on a related note, would this not work if there were NULL values? –  maneesha Dec 12 '11 at 21:11
    
No, Null = 5 results in Null, Null <> 5 results in Null, NOT (Null) also results in Null. A criteria that results in a null excludes that row from the results. –  webturner Dec 12 '11 at 21:24

I think in general that this form:

SELECT field
from list_a
where field not in (select field from list_b)  

would go as this form:

SELECT a.field
from list_a a left join (select field from list_b) b on a.field=b.field
where b.field is NULL 

I think the JOIN is faster than the NOT IN.

EDIT: Changed to show the join on a select instead of a table.

Edit: I don't understand why this answer was down voted.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks - I was wondering if I should do some type of JOIN instead of NOT IN. As for your example I'm looking to exclude results of the original query, not looking for NULL results. –  maneesha Dec 12 '11 at 21:07
    
Yes. The NULL in my code means that nothing corresponding to the joined value in A was found in B. So it would show you the values for the selected field in a that were not in b. In your case you would find participant values for the compound key sitename and year. And you would join on your select instead of joining on a table. –  mikeY Dec 12 '11 at 21:11
    
That's a good solution where the exclusions come from a different table to the source, as per your sample. Where it's the same table, as in the question, a simple change the criteria is far better. –  webturner Dec 12 '11 at 21:35
    
@webturner I have no doubt you are correct, but I couldn't get an example with your WHERE NOT ( ) syntax to run correctly in Access. Probably just me. I think my example will run joined to itself to find things only in one table with a WHERE condition on the subquery, but I might be wrong. And i think the exclusions are coming from user input as a form. Cheers. –  mikeY Dec 12 '11 at 21:56
    
If you still can't get it working, please post your non working code to a new question and we can work out the problem. A simple WHERE NOT clause is far more readable and performant than a join or subquery to the same table. –  webturner Dec 12 '11 at 22:04

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